Syllabus

course code teacher ws ss ws cr. ss cr.
Algebra01ALG Mareš 4+0 zk - - 4 -
Course:Algebra01ALGdoc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.4+0 ZK-4-
Abstract:After an introduction into the set theory standard algebraic structures are dealt with: groups, rings, fields, modules, linear algebras, lattices, Boolean algebras, rings of polynomials over commutative fields.
Outline:Axiom system for set theory, relations, ordering, equivalence and subvalence of sets, isomorphism of linearly ordered sets, well-ordering, axiom of choice, Zorn's lemma, ordinals and cardinals. Semigroups, groups, cyclic groups, congruences, factorgroupoids, homomorphism, normal subgroups, permutation groups, direct product. Rings, integral domains, fields, congruences, factorrings, homomorphism, ideals, modules, linear algebras, field of quotients, characteristic, prime field, polynomial rings, finite fields. Lattices, complete lattices, ideals, filters, distributive and modular lattices, Boolean algebras.

Outline (exercises):
Goals:nd to introduce them into the methods used in the general algebra.
Requirements:
Key words:Set, relation, ordering, group, ring, field, modul, linear algebra, lattice, Boolean algebra.
ReferencesPovinná
S. Mac Lane, G. Birkhoff: Algebra. Macmillan Com. New York 1968. (Selected chapters.)
Doporučená
R. Solomon: Abstrct Algebra. American Math.Soc. Belmont 2003.

01ALTI Pošta, Svobodová 1+1 zk - - 3 -
Course:01ALTIdoc.Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Aperiodic Structures 101APST12 Masáková 2+0 z 2+0 z 2 2
Course:Aperiodic Structures 101APST1doc.Ing. Masáková Zuzana Ph.D.----
Abstract:The seminar is devoted to combinatorics on infinite words, non-standard numeration systems and aperiodic tilings of the space.
The seminar often hosts foreign researcher. Students participate actively in solution of open problems in the field.
Outline:1. Combinatorics on words over a finite alphabet, infinite aperiodic words with low complexity. Morphisms and substitutions, their incidence matrix.
2. Aperiodic tilings of the space, self-similarity, aperiodic Delone sets, cut-and-project sets, mathematical models of quasicrystals.
3. Number representation in systems with irrational base, arithmetics in such systems.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:The seminar is an iniciation to research.

Acquired knowledge: sources of relevant mathematical literature

Acquired skills: independent research
Requirements:Knowledge of mathematics in the extent of the
FNSPE bachelor's specialization Mathematical Informatics or Mathematical modeling.
Key words:combinatorics on words, nonstandard numeration systems, mathematical models of quasicrystals
ReferencesP. Fogg, Substitutions in Dynamics, Arithmetics, and Combinatorics (Lecture Notes in Mathematics, Vol. 1794).

M. Lothaire, Algebraic Combinatorics on Words Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Course:Aperiodic Structures 201APST2doc.Ing. Masáková Zuzana Ph.D.----
Abstract:The seminar is a continuation of 01APST1. It is devoted to advanced issues of combinatorics on infinite words, non-standard numeration systems and aperiodic tilings of the space.
The seminar often hosts foreign researcher. Students participate actively in solution of open problems in the field.
Outline:1. Properties of infinite words constructed as fixed points of morphisms, palindromic and pseudopalindromic closures, codings of interval exchanges.
2. Aperiodic tilings of the space, self-similarity, aperiodic Delone sets, cut-and-project sets, mathematical models of quasicrystals.
3. Number systems with complex alphabets or complex digits. Algorithms in non-standard numeration systems.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:The seminar is an iniciation to research.

Acquired knowledge: sources of relevant mathematical literature

Acquired skills: independent research
Requirements:Knowledge of mathematics in the extent of the
FNSPE bachelor's specialization Mathematical Informatics or Mathematical modeling.
Key words:combinatorics on words, nonstandard numeration systems, mathematical models of quasicrystals
ReferencesP. Fogg, Substitutions in Dynamics, Arithmetics, and Combinatorics (Lecture Notes in Mathematics, Vol. 1794).

M. Lothaire, Algebraic Combinatorics on Words Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Application of Statistical Methods01ASM Hobza - - 2+0 kz - 2
Course:Application of Statistical Methods01ASMIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.----
Abstract:The course focuses on applications of selected methods of statistical data analysis to concrete problems including their solutions using statistical software. Namely we will deal with: hypotheses tests about parameters of normal distribution, nonparametric methods, contingency tables, linear regression and correlation, analysis of variance.
Outline:1. Hypothesis tests about parameters of normal distribution.
2. Goodnes-of-fit tests.
3. Nonparametric tests - sign and rank tests, Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test.
4. Contingency tables - tests of independence and homogeneity, McNemar's test.
5. Linear regression and correlation.
6. One-way and two-way analysis of variance.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic statistical procedures for data analysis and data visualization.

Skills:
Application of theoretically studied statistical procedures to practical problems of data analysis including use of these methods on computer in the MATLAB environment.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAB3, 01MAB4 and 01PRST held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests, linear regression, ANOVA, nonparametric tests, contingency tables.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Shao, Jun: Mathematical Statistics, Springer, New York 1999

Recommended references:
[2] J.P. Marques de Sá: Applied statistics using SPSS, STATISTICA, MATLAB and R, Springer, 2007.

Assistive Technology01ASTE Seifert 0+1 z - - 2 -
Course:Assistive Technology01ASTESeifert Radek0+1 Z-2-
Abstract:The aim of the course is to introduce the field of Assistive Technology for people with a visual impairment. Besides the technological background of the tools in use, emphasis is put on the general principles of usage and special demands of the target group of users.
Outline:1. Term "Assistive Technology?
2. Computer hardware and software
3. Webpage accessibility and the most important guidelines
4. Digitisation and archiving of textual documents
5. Basic formats accessibility
6. Braille code and tactile graphics
7. Navigation systems
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:Assistive Technology, Braille display, screen-reader, accessibility, document digitalising and archiving, Braille code, tactile graphics, orientation systems
References[1] Assistive technology. In Wikipedia : the free encyclopedia [online]. St. Petersburg (Florida) : Wikipedia Foundation, [cit. 2010-12-22]. [2] KONECNY, Josef. Blind Friendly [online]. 2007 [cit. 2010-12-22]. Malé nahlédnutí do historie hlasovych syntéz [3] PAVLICEK, Radek. Blind Friendly [online]. 2.3. 2005-03-31 [cit. 2010-12-22]. Metodika Blind Friendly Web.

Asymptotical Methods01ASY Mikyška - - 2+1 z,zk - 3
Course:Asymptotical Methods01ASYdoc. Ing. Mikyška Jiří Ph.D.2+1 Z,ZK-3-
Abstract:Examples. Addition parts of mathematical analysis (generalized Lebesgue integral, parametric integrals.) Asymptotic relations a expansions - properties; algebraical and analytical operations. Applied asymptotics of sequences and sums; integrals of Laplace and Fourier type.
Outline:1. Landau symbols
2. Asymptotic sequences and Asymptotic expansions of functions.
3. Basic properties of asymptotic expansions and algebraic operations with them
4. Differentiation and integration of the asymptotic relations
5. Asymptotics of sequences
6. Asymptotics of series
7. Asymptotics of the roots of algebraic equations
8. Supplement to mathematical analysis - generalized Lebesgue integral
9. Asymptotics of the Laplace integrals, Laplace theorem, Watson's lemma.
10. Examples, applications of the asymptotic methods.
Outline (exercises):1. Examples of the asymptotic expansions of functions and their properties
2. Basic properties of asymptotic expansions and algebraic operations with them
3. Asymptotics of sequences, Stirling's formula
4. Asymptotics of series, approximation of pi.
5. Asymptotics of the roots of algebraic equations
6. Asymptotics of the Laplace integrals, applications of the Laplace theorem and Watson's lemma
7. Examples, applications of the asymptotic methods.
Goals:Euler-Maclaurin summation formula, perturbation methods, Laplace method, Watson's lemma.

Skills: Application of the asymptotical methods for investigation of the asymptotics of sequences, series, and integrals of Laplace and Fourier type.
Requirements:Basic courses of Calculus (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4 held at the FNSPE
CTU in Prague).
Key words:Asymptotic expansions, asymptotics of sequences, asymptotics of series, asymptotics of roots of algebraic equations, Laplace method, Watson's lemma, generalized Lebesgue integral.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] P. D. Miller: Applied Asymptotic Analysis, Graduate Studies in Applied Mathematics, Vol. 75, American Mathematical Society, 2006.

Recommended references:
[2] E. T. Copson: Asymptotic Expansions, Cambridge University Press, 1965.
[3] N. G. de Bruin: Asymptotic Methods in Analysis, North Holland Publishing Co., 1958.
[4] F. J. Olver: Asymptotics and special functions, Academic press, New York (1974)

Bayesian principles in statistics01BAPS Kůs 3+0 zk - - 3 -
Course:Bayesian principles in statistics01BAPSIng. Kůs Václav Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Bachelor's Degree Project 101BPAI12 Strachota 0+5 z 0+10 z 5 10
Course:Bachelor's Degree Project 101BPAI1Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.----
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:The ability of the independent students work and skills.
Key words:
References

Course:Bachelor's Degree Project 201BPAI2Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.----
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Bachelor Thesis 101BPAM12 Strachota 0+5 z 0+10 z 5 10
Course:Bachelor Thesis 101BPAM1Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.----
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: particular theme depending
on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:The ability of the independent students work and skills.
Key words:Bachelor's degree project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual

Course:Bachelor Thesis 201BPAM2Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.----
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: particular theme depending
on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:The ability of independent students work and skills.
Key words:Bachelor's degree project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual

Bachelor Thesis 101BPMM12 Strachota 0+5 z 0+10 z 5 10
Course:Bachelor Thesis 101BPMM1Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.0+5 Z-5-
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: particular theme depending
on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:The ability of the independent students work and skills.
Key words:Bachelor's degree project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual

Course:Bachelor Thesis 201BPMM2Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.-0+10 Z-10
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: particular theme depending
on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:The ability of independent students work and skills.
Key words:Bachelor's degree project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual

Bachelor Thesis 101BPSI12 Strachota 0+5 z 0+10 z 5 10
Course:Bachelor Thesis 101BPSI1Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.0+5 Z-5-
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: particular theme depending
on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:The ability of the independent students work and skills.
Key words:Bachelor's degree project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual

Course:Bachelor Thesis 201BPSI2Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.-0+10 Z-10
Abstract:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the bachalor project under preparation.
Outline:Bachelor's Degree project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: particular theme depending
on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:The ability of the independent students work and skills.
Key words:Bachelor's degree project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual

Bachelor Seminar01BSEM Strachota - - 0+2 z - 2
Course:Bachelor Seminar01BSEMIng. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:Bachelor seminar - technical details of bachelor thesis, format and processing, prerequisities, individual student presentations of their research results.
Outline:Bachelor seminar - technical details of bachelor thesis, format and processing, prerequisities, individual student presentations of their research results.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Verify the quality of bachelor thesis and the presentation skills of individual student.
Requirements:The ability of creating own professional presentation on the topic of bacholor thesis.
Key words:Bachelor thesis, its defence, form of presentation, presentation itself.
ReferencesIndividual

History of Mathematics01DEM Dvořáková - - 0+2 z - 1
Course:History of Mathematics01DEMIng. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D. / doc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.-0+2 Z-1
Abstract:The subject has the form of regular seminars where the members of the department of mathematics, but also invited speakers - specialists in the field - give their talks on varoius topics from the history of mathematics.
Outline:Outline of the subject changes every year depending upon invited lecturers. In general, the topics can be divided into the following areas: 1. Development of mathematical disciplines 2. Portraits of important mathematicians 3. History of mathematics within a certain region 4. History of well-known constants 5. Philosophy and mathematics
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge in the history of mathematics - good orientation in the history of different mathematical fields and knowledge of important personalities and their discoveries.
Requirements:
Key words:Mesopotamian, Egyptian mathematics, Greek mathematics, proof, Thales, Pythagoras, Euclid, Fibonacci, Arabic mathematics, Indian mathematics, zero, Brahmagupta, complex numbers, Gauss, groups, Abel, Galois, calculus, Cauchy, Newton, Leibniz, probability, Pascal, sets, computability, decidability, Russell, Goedel, Turing, vector spaces, Banach
ReferencesKey references:
[1]D. E. Smith, History of Mathematics, New York, Inc., Dover publications, 1958, volume I. and II.
Recommended references:
[2]R. Cooke, The History of Mathematics, A Brief Course, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1997

Differential Equations01DIFR Beneš - - 3+1 z,zk - 4
Course:Differential Equations01DIFRprof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal-3+1 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:The course contains introduction in the solution of ordinary differential equations. It contains a survey of equation types solvable analytically, basics of the existence theory, solution of linear types of equations and introduction in the theory of boundary-value problems.
Outline:1. Introduction - motivation in applications
2. Basics - theory of ordinary differential equations
3. Particular types of 1st-order ODEs.
- separated and separable equations
- homogeneous equations
- equations with the rational argument of the righthand side
- linear equations
- Bernoulli equations
- Riccati equations
- Equations x=f(y') a y=f(y')
4. Existence theory for equations y'=f(x,y)
- Peano theorem
- Osgood theorem
5. Sensitivity on the righthand side and on the initial conditions
6. Linear n-th order differential equations
7. Systems of 1st order linear differential equations
8. Boundary-value problems
Outline (exercises):1. Equations with separated variables
2. Separable equations
3. Homogeneous differential equations
4. Generalized (quasi-homogeneous) differential equations
5. Equations with rational righthand-side argument s racionálním argumentem
6. Linear 1st-order differential equations
7. Bernoulli equations
8. Riccati equations
9. Differential equations x=f(y') a y=f(y')
10. Linear n-th order differential equations
with constant coefficients
11. Fundamental system for linear n-th order differential equations
12. Systems of linear 1st order differential equations with constant coefficients
Goals:Knowledge:
analytical solution of selected types of equations, the basics of the existence theory, solution of linear types of equations

Skills:
Analytical solution of the known types of ordinary differential equations, mathematical analysis of the initial-value problems, solution of linear n-th order differential equations and of the system of 1st-order linear ordinary differential equations.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Initial-value problems for differential equations, Euler approximation, Peano theorem, fundamental system, wronskian, method of variation of constants.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J. Kluvánek, L. Mišík a M. Švec. Mathematics II, SVTL Bratislava 1961 (in Slovak)
[2] K. Rektorys a kol. Survey of Applied Mathematics, Prometheus, Praha 1995 (in Czech)

Recommended references:
[3] L. S. Pontryagin, Ordinary Differential Equations. Addison-Wesley, London 1962
[4] A. D. Polyanin and V. F. Zaitsev, Handbook of Exact Solutions for Ordinary Differential Equations, Chapman and Hall/CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2003
[5] M.W.Hirsch, S.Smale, Differential Equations, Dynamical systems, and Linear Algebra, Academic Press, Boston, 1974
[6] F.Verhulst, Nonlinear Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems, Springer, Berlin 1990
[7] W. Walter, Gewöhnliche Differenzialgleichungen, Springer, Berlin 1990

Discrete Mathematics 101DIM12 Masáková 2+0 z 2+0 z 2 2
Course:Discrete Mathematics 101DIM1doc.Ing. Masáková Zuzana Ph.D.2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:The seminar is devoted to elementary number theory and applications. It includes individual problem solving.
Outline:1. Divisibility, congruences, Femat's little theorem. 2. Euler's function, Moebius function, inclusion exclusion principle. 3. Perfect numbers, Mersenne's primes, Fermat's numbers. 4. Primality testing. Public key cryptographic systems: RSA, knapsack problem.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Acquired knowledge: Students learn to solve some types of elementary number theoretical problems.

Acquired skills: The emphasis is put on correct formulation of mathematical ideas and logic process.
Requirements:Knowledge of grammer school mathematics is assumed.
Key words:Modular arithmetics, Euler's function, primes, RSA
ReferencesRonald L. Graham, Donald E. Knuth, Oren Patashnik, Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science, Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley, 1994

J. Herman, R. Kučera, J. Šimša,
Equations and Inequalities: Elementary Problems and Theorems in Algebra and Number Theory. 1. vyd. New York : Springer-Verlag,
2000. 355 s. Canadian Mathematical Society Books in Math.

P. Erdös, J. Surányi, Topics in the Theory of Numbers,
Springer-Verlag, 2001.

M. Křížek, F. Luca, L. Somer,
17 Lectures on Fermat Numbers: From Number Theory to Geometry, CMS Books in Mathematics, vol. 9, Springer-Verlag, New
York, 2001.

Course:Discrete Mathematics 201DIM2doc.Ing. Masáková Zuzana Ph.D.-2+0 Z-2
Abstract:The seminar is devoted to recurrence relations. It includes individual problem solving.
Outline:1. Recurrence relations: Linear difference equations, some types of non-linear recurrences, inverting formula. 2. Josephus problem. 3. Fibonacci numbers and Wythoff's game. 4. Integer coefficient polynomials and their rational roots, Viete relations.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Acquired knowledge: Students learn to solve linear recurrence relations with constant coefficients and some other types of difference equations.

Acquired skills: The emphasis is put on correct formulation of mathematical ideas and logic process.
Requirements:Knowledge of grammer school mathematics is assumed. Also knowledge of FNSPE courses 01MA1, 01LA1 is needed.
Key words:recurrence relations, difference equations,
Josephus problem, Fibonacci numbers
ReferencesRonald L. Graham, Donald E. Knuth, Oren Patashnik, Concrete Mathematics: A Foundation for Computer Science, Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley, 1994

P. Cull, M. Flahive, R. Robson, Difference Equations, Springer, 2005.

J. Herman, R. Kučera, J. Šimša,
Equations and Inequalities: Elementary Problems and Theorems in Algebra and Number Theory. 1. vyd. New York : Springer-Verlag,
2000. 355 s. Canadian Mathematical Society Books in Math.

Discrete Mathematics 301DIM3 Masáková 2+0 z - - 2 -
Course:Discrete Mathematics 301DIM3doc.Ing. Masáková Zuzana Ph.D.2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:The subject is devoted to elementary proofs of non-trivial combinatoriwal identities and to generating functions and their applications. In the seminar students present a problem with solution chosen from the given literature.
Outline:1. Methods of combinatorial proof. 2. Stirling, Bernoulli, Catalan and Bell numbers. 3. Ordinary, exponential and Dirichlet generating functions. 4. Evaluation of sums, solution of linear and non-linear difference equations. 5. Applications in number theory and graph theory.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Students learn methods of combinatorial proof, use of generating functions for solution of difference equations and for proving combinatorial identities. Students also learn comprehension of English written mathematical text and learn to present it to others.
Requirements:Knowledge of FNSPE courses 01MA1, 01MAA2, 01LA1, 01LAA2 is required.
Key words:generating functions, combinatorial identities, difference equations
ReferencesM. Aigner, G. M. Ziegler, Proofs from the Book, Springer-Verlag 2004

A. T. Benjamin, J. J. Quinn, Proofs that Really Count, The Art of Combinatorial Proof, The Mathematical Association of America, 2003.

A. M. Yaglom, I. M. Yaglom, Challenging Mathematical Problems with Elementary Solutions, Dover Publications, 1987.

H. Dörrie, 100 Great Problems of Elementary Mathematics, Dover Publications, 1965.

Kombinatorické počítání 1999 , KAM-DIMATIA Series preprint no. 451 (1999), 59 p

Master Thesis 101DPAM12 Ambrož 0+10 z 0+20 z 10 20
Course:Master Thesis 101DPAM1Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.----
Abstract:Master's thesis preparation.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: a particular field depending on the project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:Master's thesis.
References

Course:Master Thesis 201DPAM2Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.----
Abstract:Master's thesis preparation.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: a particular field depending on the given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:Master's thesis.
References

Master Thesis 101DPMM12 Ambrož 0+10 z 0+20 z 10 20
Course:Master Thesis 101DPMM1Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.0+10 Z-10-
Abstract:Master's thesis preparation.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: a particular field depending on the given project topic. Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:master's thesis
References

Course:Master Thesis 201DPMM2Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.-0+20 Z-20
Abstract:Master's thesis preparation.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: a particular field depending on the given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:Master's thesis.
References

Master Thesis 101DPSI12 Ambrož 0+10 z 0+20 z 10 20
Course:Master Thesis 101DPSI1Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.0+10 Z-10-
Abstract:Master's thesis preparation.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: a particular field depending on the given project topic. Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:master's thesis
References

Course:Master Thesis 201DPSI2Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.-0+20 Z-20
Abstract:Master's thesis preparation.
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: a particular field depending on the given project topic. Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing an original specialist text.
Requirements:
Key words:master's thesis
References

Differential Calculus on Manifolds01DPV Tušek - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Differential Calculus on Manifolds01DPVIng. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:Smooth manifold, tangent space differential forms, tensors, Riemannian metrics and manifold, covariant derivative, parallel transport, orientation of manifold, itegration on manifold and Stokes theorem.
Outline:1. Smooth manifolds 2. Tangent and cotangent space 3. Tensors, differential forms 4. Orientation of manifold, integration on manifold 5. Stokes theorem 6. Riemannian manifold.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: To get acquainted with basic notions of differential geometry with emphasis on mathematical details.
Abilities: Consequently, to be able to self-study advanced physical (not only) literature.
Requirements:Basic course in Calculus and Linear Algebra and topology (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01TOP held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Differential geometry, Riemannian manifold, Stokes theorem.
Referenceskey references:
[1] J.M. Lee: Introduction to Smooth Manifolds, Springer, 2003.
recommended references:
[2] J. M Lee: Riemannian Manifolds: An Introduction to Curvature, Springer, 1997.
[3] M. Spivak: Calculus on Manifolds, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1965.
[4] F. Morgan: Riemannian Geometry: A Begginer's Guide, Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 1993.

Diploma Seminar01DSEMI Ambrož - - 0+2 z - 3
Course:Diploma Seminar01DSEMIIng. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Introduction to Continuum Dynamics01DYK Fučík, Strachota - - 0+2 z - 2
Course:Introduction to Continuum Dynamics01DYKIng. Fučík Radek Ph.D. / Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.----
Abstract:This course is an introduction to the mathematical description of continuum dynamics. It summarizes the necessary mathematical apparatus with emphasis on vector and tensor calculus, differential forms, and integration on manifolds. It includes the basic concepts of continuum mechanics such as shear tensor or substantial derivative, by means of which it is possible to derive the fundamental laws of conservation of mass, momentum, angular momentum, energy and entropy in integral and differential form. In the last part of the course, these conservation laws are adapted to the case of viscous and inviscid fluid and linear and nonlinear elastic body.
Outline:1. Mathematical background
a) vector and tensor calculus
b) differential forms
c) integration on manifolds
2. Basic concepts of continuum mechanics
a) movement and deformation of continuum
b) the strain tensor and small strain tensor
c) decomposition of deformation, rotation
d) substantial derivative of scalar, vector and volume quantities
3. Conservation laws
a) conservation of mass
b) conservation of momentum
c) conservation of angular momentum
d) conservation of mechanical energy
c) conservation of total energy
d) conservation of entropy
4. Constitutive relations
a) inviscid fluid
b) viscous fluid
c) non-linear elastic body
d) linear elastic body
5. Selected applications
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
The basic principles of continuum mechanics description. Conservation laws for mass, momentum, angular momentum, energy and entropy. Constitutive equations for viscous and inviscid fluid. Constitutive relations for linear and nonlinear elastic body.

Abilities:
Derivation of basic conservation laws. Derivation of the constitutive relations for the case of fluid or elastic body.
Requirements:Basic courses in calculus, linear algebra, theoretical physics and differential equations (according lectures at CTU in Prague 01DIFR, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01MA1, 01MAA2, 01MAA3, 02TEF1).
Key words:strain rate tensor, stress tensor, Stokesian fluid, ideal fluid, Newtonian fluid, continuity equation, Euler equations, Navier-Stokes equations. Conservation laws.
ReferencesMandatory reading:
[1] Gurtin, Morton E. An introduction to continuum mechanics. Vol. 158. Academic Pr, 1981.
[2] Anderson, John D. Computational Fluid Dynamics: The Basics with Applications. McGraw-Hill, 1995.

Recommended reading:
[2] Chorin, Alexandre Joel, and Jerrold E. Marsden. A mathematical introduction to fluid mechanics. New York: Springer, 1990.
[3] Maršík, F. (1999). Termodynamika kontinua. Academia.

Dynamic Decision Making01DYRO Guy, Kárný 3+1 zk - - 4 -
Course:Dynamic Decision Making01DYROIng. Guy Tatiana Valentine Ph.D. / Ing. Kárný Miroslav DrSc.----
Abstract:
Outline:Basic theory: Introduction to decision making (DM); general conventions and notions; behavior and its parts; decomposition of DM; ordering of behaviors and strategies;
Bayesian DM: Basic DM Lemma; dynamic DM Design; Bayesian filtering and estimation; asymptotic of the design and of the estimation.
Fully Probabilistic Design (FPD): formulation and solution; FPD and traditional DM; principle of probability density approximation; principle of minimum Kullback-Leibler divergence; extension of non-probabilistic knowledge; merging of incompletely compatible probability densities; need for approximation.
Practical Aspects: feasible and approximate learning; DM elements and basic DM types; estimation in exponential family; estimation with forgetting; feasible and approximate design; simplified models and optimization spaces; knowledge and preference elicitation.
DM with Multiple Imperfect Participants: introduction to multi-participant DM; imperfectness of participants; cooperation of participants.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:This course provides a basic understanding of dynamic decision making (DM) under uncertainty and related tools. The students will learn how to formulate and solve DM problems using the described methodology. The course also introduces a non-trivial extension of Bayesian DM called Fully Probabilistic Design (FPD). The course offers a unified view on stochastic filtration and dynamic programming. It introduces a conceptually feasible construction of respective probabilistic description, and elements of multi-participant DM. The course content is illustrated by examples of real applications.
Requirements:Basic courses of mathematical analysis, statistics and algebra; ideally, control theory
Key words:
References[1] M. Kárný, J. Bohm, T.V. Guy, L. Jirsa, I. Nagy, P. Nedoma, and L. Tesař. Optimized Bayesian Dynamic Advising: Theory and Algorithms. Springer, London, 2006.
[2] M. Kárný and T.V. Guy. Fully probabilistic control design. Systems & Control Letters, 55(4), 2006.
[3] M. Kárný and T.V. Guy. On support of imperfect Bayesian participants. In: T.V. Guy, M. Kárný, and D.H. Wolpert, Eds, Decision Making with Imperfect Decision Makers, volume 28, Springer, Berlin, 2012.
[4] M. Kárný and T. Kroupa. Axiomatisation of fully probabilistic design. Information Sciences, 186(1), 2012.

Theory of Dynamic Systems01DYSY Augustová - - 3+0 zk - 3
Course:Theory of Dynamic Systems01DYSYMgr.RNDr. Augustová Petra Ph.D.-3+0 ZK-3
Abstract:The course provides an introduction to system theory with emphasis on control theory and understanding of the fundamental concepts of systems and control theory. First, we build up the understanding of the dynamical behavior of systems as well as provide the necessary mathematical background. Internal and external system descriptions are described in detail, including state variable, impulse response and transfer function, polynomial matrix, and fractional representations. Stability, controllability, observability, and realizations are explained with the emphasis always being on fundamental results. State feedback, state estimation, and eigenvalue assignment are discussed in detail. All stabilizing feedback controllers are also parameterized using polynomial and fractional system representations. The emphasis in this primer is on linear time-invariant systems, both continuous and discrete time.
Outline:1. Introduction to the general theory of systems (decision, control, control structures, object, model, system).
2. Description of the systems (input-output and state space description of the system, stochastic processes and systems, system coupling).
3. Innner dynamics, input- output constraints (solution of state space equations, modes of the system, response of continuous and discrete time systems, stability, reachability and observability).
4. Modification of dynamic properties of the system (state feedback, state reconstruction, separation principle, decomposition and system realization, system sensitivity analysis).
5. Control (state feedback, feedback control systems).
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledges: Students will emerge with a clear picture of the dynamical behavior of linear systems and their advantages and limitations.
Skills: They will be able to describe the system, analyze its properties (stability, controllability, observability) and apply the system theory to particular examples in physics and engineering.
Requirements:Undergraduate-level differential equations and linear algebra (in the extent of the courses 01DIFR, 01LA1, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Dynamic systems, linear systems, stability, controllability, observability, linearization, control theory.
ReferencesKey references
[1] P. J. Antsaklis, A. N. Michel: A Linear Systems Primer. Birkhäuser, 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0-8176-4460-4

Recommended references
[1] Mikleš, J. a Fikar, M., Process Modelling, Identification, and Control, Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2007. ISBN-13: 978-3540719694
[2] P. J. Antsaklis and A. N. Michel, Linear Systems, Birkhäuser, Boston, MA, 2006. ISBN-13: 978-0817644345
[3] T. Kailath: Linear systems. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1980. ISBN-13: 978-0135369616

Elementary Introduction to Graph Theory01EIGR Ambrož, Masáková 2+0 kz - - 2 -
Course:Elementary Introduction to Graph Theory01EIGRIng. Ambrož Petr Ph.D. / doc.Ing. Masáková Zuzana Ph.D.----
Abstract:The course provides an explanation of basic graph theory followed by a survey of common graph algorithms.
Outline:1. Basic and enumerative combinatorics.
2. The Notion of a graph.
3. Trees and spanning trees.
4. Eulerian trails and Hamiltonian cycles.
5. Flows in networks.
6. Colouring and matching.
7. Planar graphs.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
ReferencesPovinná literatura:
[1] J.A. Bondy, U.S.R. Murty: Graph theory. Graduate Texts in Mathematics 244. Springer, New York, (2008).

Doporučená literatura:
[2] M. Bóna. A Walk Through Combinatorics. World Scientific, Singapoore (2006)
[3] Ján Plesník. Grafové algoritmy. Veda, Bratislava, (1983).

Functional Analysis 101FA1 Havlíček 2+1 z,zk - - 3 -
Course:Functional Analysis 101FA1prof.Ing. Havlíček Miloslav DrSc. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.2+1 Z,ZK-3-
Abstract:Continuing course of mathematical analysis and algebra introduction to the basics of functional analysis. There are the concepts that students need to understand the various physical and technical disciplines.
Outline:1. Vector spaces 2. Metric and topological spaces 3.Topological vector spaces 4.Banach spaces 5.Bounded linear mappings 6. Fourier-Plancherel operator, Fourier transformation 7. Spectrum of closed linear operators 8.Hermitean operators, Projectors 9.Unitary and isometrical operators 10.Spectral properties of normal operators 11.Ideal of the compact operators 12. Spectrum of compact operators
Outline (exercises):Exercise is closely linked to the lecture, which is illustrated by appropriate examples. Accent is placed on the correctness of the calculation.
Goals:Complete mathematical education of our graduates oriented research.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA, 01MAA2-4, 01LAP, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Banach spaces, Hilbert spaces, Linear operators, Fourier transform.
ReferencesKey references: J.Blank.P,Exner,M.Havlíček: Hilbert Space Operators in Quantum Physics, Springer,2008.
Recommended references: M. Reed, B. Simon : Methods of Modern Mathematical Physics I.-IV. ACADEMIC PRESS, N.Z. 1972-1979.

Functional Analysis 201FA2 Šťovíček - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Functional Analysis 201FA2prof.Ing. Šťovíček Pavel DrSc.-2+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:The course aims to present selected fundamental results from functional analysis including basic theorems of the theory of Banach spaces, Hilbert-Schmidt operators, spectral decomposition of bounded self-adjoint operators and basics of the theory of unbounded self-adjoint operators.
Outline:1. The Baire theorem, the Banach-Steinhaus theorem (the principle of uniform boundedness), the open mapping theorem, the closed graph theorem, the Hahn-Banach theorem. 2. Spectrum of closed operators in Banach spaces, the graph of an operator, analytic properties of a resolvent, the spectral radius. 3. Compact operators (a summary), the Arzela-Ascoli theorem, Hilbert-Schmidt operators. 4. The Weyl criterion, properties of spectra of bounded self-adjoint operators and the spectral decomposition, functional calculus. 5. Adjoint operators to unbounded operators in Hilbert spaces, basics of the theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators.
Outline (exercises):1. Exercises devoted to basic properties of Hilbert spaces and to the orthogonal projection theorem. 2. The quotient of a Banach space by a closed subspace. 3. Properties of projection operators in Banach spaces and orthogonal projections in Hilbert spaces. 4. Examples of the application of the principle of uniform boundedness. 5. Exercises focused on integral operators, Hilbert-Schmidt operators. 6. Examples of the spectral decomposition of bounded self-adjoint operators.
Goals:Knowledge of basics of the theory of Banach spaces, selected results about compact operators and the spectral analysis in Hilbert spaces. Skills to apply this knowledge during subsequent studies aimed on partial differential equations and integral equations, and in solving problems of mathematical physics.
Requirements:Basic courses of Calculus and Linear Algebra, and Functional Analysis 2 (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01FA1 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Banach space, Hilbert space, spectrum, the principle of uniform boundedness, the open mapping theorem, Hahn-Banach theorem, the Arzela-Ascoli theorem, Hilbert-Schmidt operators, spectrum of a bounded operator, self-adjoint operator, spectral decomposition
ReferencesKey references: [1] J. Blank, P. Exner, M. Havlíček: Hilbert Space Operators in Quantum Physics, (American Institute of Physics, New York, 1994); Recommended references: [2] W. Rudin: Real and Complex Analysis, (McGrew-Hill, Inc., New York, 1974), [3] A. N. Kolmogorov, S. V. Fomin: Elements of the Theory of Functions and Functional Analysis, (Dover Publications, 1999), [4] A. E. Taylor: Introduction to Functional Analysis, (John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1976).

Functional Analysis 301FA3 Havlíček 2+1 z,zk - - 3 -
Course:Functional Analysis 301FA3prof.Ing. Havlíček Miloslav DrSc. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.2+1 Z,ZK-3-
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Financial and Insurance Mathematics01FIMA Hora 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Financial and Insurance Mathematics01FIMAHora Jan Mgr.2 ZK-2-
Abstract:This course is an introduction to the problems of life and non-life insurance and financial mathematics.
Outline:1. Fundamentals of Financial Mathematics (interest, etc.) 2. Fundamentals of Demographics (especially mortality) 3. Life Insurance (premium, reserves, reinsurance) 4. Non-life insurance (premium, reserves, reinsurance) 5. Financial Mathematics (Securities)
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Principles of calculation and the calculation of insurance premiums, life insurance reserves, reserves for insurance benefits (especialy IBNR reserves), prices of selected securities
Requirements:Basic course of probability and mathematical statistics
Key words:Mortality, interest, net premium, gross premium, reserves, reinsurance, bonds, equities, options
ReferencesKey references:
Actuarial Mathematics, Newton L. Bowers, Hans U. Gerber, James C. Hickman, Donald A. Jones, Cecil J. Nesbitt, Society of Actuaries; 2nd edition (May 1997)

Recommended references:
A Course in Financial Calculus, Alison Etheridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002

Functions of Complex Variable01FKP Pošta 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Functions of Complex Variable01FKPdoc.Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.2+0 ZK-2-
Abstract:The course develops advanced properties of systems of holomorphic functions, Ascoli-Vitali's theorem, advanced properties of conformal mappings, transcendental and meromorphic functions. Basic properties of complex functions of several complex variables together with improper line integrals and its applications are presented.
Outline:1. Review of basic theorems of complex analysis. 2. Fundamental properties of the holomorphic functions, normal family of holomorfic functions in connected region, Ascoli-Vitali's theorem. 3. Theorem of Riemann, conformal mapping. 4. Transcendental and meromorphic functions. 5. Generalized series in C. 6. Complex functions of several complex variables. 7. Holomorphic functions of several complex variables. 8. Improper line integrals with parameters. 9. Holomorphic functions and line integrals with parameters. 10. Bessel functions and line integrals with parameters.
Outline (exercises):No lecture exercises.
Goals:Active knowledge of properties of holomorphic function systems and basic properties of functions of several complex variable.
Requirements:Mathematical analysis courses (01MA1, 01MAA2-4 or 01MAB2-4)
Key words:complex variable, several complex variables, holomorphic functions, conformal mapping, Bessel functions, line integrals
References[1] I. Černý: Foundations of Analysis in the Complex Domain. Academia, Praha 1992
[2] W. Rudin: Real and complex analysis, McGraw-Hill, Boston 1987

Functions of Complex Variable B01FKPB Pošta 2+0 z - - 2 -
Course:Functions of Complex Variable B01FKPBdoc.Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:The course develops advanced properties of systems of holomorphic functions, Ascoli-Vitali's theorem, advanced properties of conformal mappings, transcendental and meromorphic functions. Basic properties of complex functions of several complex variables together with improper line integrals and its applications are presented.
Outline:1. Review of basic theorems of complex analysis. 2. Fundamental properties of the holomorphic functions, normal family of holomorfic functions in connected region, Ascoli-Vitali's theorem. 3. Theorem of Riemann, conformal mapping. 4. Transcendental and meromorphic functions. 5. Generalized series in C. 6. Complex functions of several complex variables. 7. Holomorphic functions of several complex variables. 8. Improper line integrals with parameters. 9. Holomorphic functions and line integrals with parameters. 10. Bessel functions and line integrals with parameters.
Outline (exercises):No lecture exercises.
Goals:Active knowledge of properties of holomorphic function systems and basic properties of functions of several complex variable.
Requirements:Mathematical analysis courses (01MA1, 01MAA2-4 or 01MAB2-4)
Key words:complex variable, several complex variables, holomorphic functions, conformal mapping, Bessel functions, line integrals
References[1] I. Černý: Foundations of Analysis in the Complex Domain. Academia, Praha 1992
[2] W. Rudin: Real and complex analysis, McGraw-Hill, Boston 1987

Geometric Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations01GTDR Beneš 0+2 z - - 2 -
Course:Geometric Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations01GTDRprof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:The seminar consists of the qualitative theory of ODEs dealing with the geometric and topological properties of the solution. In this context, we mention suitably formulated basic results of the existence and uniqueness, continuous dependence on parameters and initial conditions. Main part is devoted to the autonomous systems.
Outline:1. Basic theorem on the local existence and uniqueness of the solution
2. Theorem of continuous dependence on parameters
3. Differentiability with respect to parameters
4. Continuous dependence on initial conditions, and dfferentiability with respect to initial conditions
5. Basics of the theory of autonomous systems
6. Analysis of solution of autonomous systems (special solutions, phase space)
7. Exponentials of operators
8. Systems 2 x 2
9. Lyapunov stability
10. Limit cycles
11. Poincaré map
12. First integrals and integral manifolds
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
geometric theory of ordinary differential equations, autonomous systems, Lyapunov stability, limit cycles, Poincaré map

Skills:
Formulation of initial value problems for ordinary differential equation. Proving basic mathematical properties of given problems, geometric analysis of the solution.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01DIFR held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Ordinary differential equations, qualitative theory, parmeter dependence, autonomous systems, limit cycles, Poincaré map.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] M.W.Hirsch, S.Smale, Differential Equations, Dynamical systems, and Linear Algebra, Academic Press, Boston, 1974
[2] F.Verhulst, Nonlinear Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 1990

Recommended references:
[3] L. S. Pontryagin, Ordinary Differential Equations. Addison-Wesley, London 1962

Languages and Automata01JAA Mareš - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Languages and Automata01JAAdoc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:Various types of generative grammars and corresponding automata. Closure and algorithmic problems.
Outline:Generative grammars, Chomsky classification, type 0 languages and Turing machines, context-sensitive languages and linear bounded automata, context-free languages and pushdown storage automata, type 3 languages, finite automata, and regular languages, closure properties and algorithmic properties.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To acquaint the students with classical results of the theory of formal languages, generative grammars, and automata-acceptors.
Requirements:
Key words:Language, grammar, automaton..
ReferencesPovinná
Lewis H.R., Papadimitriou C.H.: Elements of the Theory of Computation. PrenticeHall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1981.
Doporučená
Salomaa A.: Formal Languages. Academic Press, New York,1973.

Simple Compilers01JEPR Čulík - - 2 z - 2
Course:Simple Compilers01JEPRIng. Čulík Zdeněk-2 Z-2
Abstract:Lexical and syntax analysis, code generation, simple optimizations, development environments, reflection.
Outline:1. Lexical and syntax analysis of programming languages (Pascal, C++, Java)
2. Data structures for representations of expressions, statements, types and declarations 3. Programs for automatic compiler generations (Lex, Yacc, ANTLR) Simple optimizations
4. Code generation
5. Principles of integrated development environments, influence of run time type identification.
6. Overview of syntax analysis and code generation in GNU Compiler Collection.
7. Other GNU programs for software development.
Outline (exercises):1. Simple lexical analysis written in C programming language
2. Semantic analysis
3. Type and declaration processing, navigation trees in used in development environments
4. Semantic analyzers generated by ANTLR program
5. Simple code generation, register allocation
6. Extension modules for GCC and LLVM/CLang compilers

Goals:Knowledge:
Structure of programming language compilers, machine code generation, translation to another programming language

Skills:
To develop syntactic and semantic analysis of simple programming language using modern grammar generators.
Requirements:
Key words:Programming languages, compilers.
References[1] N. Wirth: Compiler Construction, Addison Wesley, 1996
[2] S. Pemberton, M. Daniels: Pascal Implementation: The P4 Compiler, Prentice Hall, 1983
[š] D. Grune, C. Jacobs: Parsing Techniques - A Practical Guide, Ellis Horwood, 1990
[4] http://www.antlr.org

Combinatorics and Probability01KAP Hobza 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Combinatorics and Probability01KAPIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.2+0 ZK-2-
Abstract:The course is devoted to combinatorial rules, definition of the probability, explication of random variable and its characteristics. It explains term of distribution function and examples of discrete and continuous random variables are mentioned. Emphasis is placed on using of these terms and rules.
Outline:1.Combinatorial rules, variation, combination, permutation (with repetition and without repetition), properties of binomial coefficient, the binomial theorem
2. The classical definition of probability, the geometric probability definition, the mathematical model of probability (events, calculus of events, axioms of probability, dependence and independence of events)
3. Random variables (probability distribution function, discrete and continuous random variables and examples of these variables)
4. Expected value, variance, moments of random variables, the law of large numbers, the central limit theorem
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic combinatorial rules, fundamentals of probability theory.

Skills:
Application of theoretical knowledge to solution of concrete problems. Ability of calculation of probability (conditional and unconditional), computation of moments of random variables and application of the central limit theorem.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus
(in the exten of thecourses 01MAT1, 01MAT2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Variation, combination, permutation, probability, event, random variable, distribution function, probability density function, discrete random variable, absolutely continuos variable, expected value, variance, the law of large numbers, the central limit theorem.
ReferencesKeyreferences:
[1] D.C. Montgomery, G.C. Runger: Applied statistics and probability for engineers, Wiley, 2003

Recommended references:
[2] H. G. Tucker: An introduction to probability and mathematical statistics, Academic Press, 1963

Quantum Physics01KF Havlíček - - 4+2 z,zk - 6
Course:Quantum Physics01KFprof.Ing. Havlíček Miloslav DrSc.-4+2 Z,ZK-6
Abstract:Basic quantum theory presented via rigorous mathematical methods.
Outline:1. States and observables 2. Basic postolates of non-relativistic quantum mechanics 3. Mixed states 4. Superselection rules 5. Compatibility, complete sets of compatible observables 6. Uncertainity relations 7. Canonical commutation relations 8. Time evolution 9. Feynman integral 10. Non-conservative systems 11. Composed systéme 12. Identical particles
Outline (exercises):Exercise is devoted to illustrate lectures by good examples and complements by the other lecture topics.
Goals:To give graduates the basic quantum mechanics with a mathematically correct formulation.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LAP, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Non-relativistic quantum mechanics, mathematical descriptions
ReferencesKey references: J.Blank,P.Exner,M.Havlicek:Hilbert Space Operators in Quantum Physics.Springer,2008
Recommended references: George Mackey (2004). The mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics. Dover Publications. ISBN 0-486-43517-2.

Conference Research Week, Excursion01KTVE Krbálek, Kůs - - 5 dní z - 1
Course:Conference Research Week, Excursion01KTVEdoc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D. / Ing. Kůs Václav Ph.D.-5dní Z-1
Abstract:Active participation the summer conference "Stochastic and physical monitoring systems,? presentation of student?s research, publication in proceedings of conference
Outline:Active participation the summer conference "Stochastic and physical monitoring systems,? presentation of student?s research, publication in proceedings of conference
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: Improvement of knowledge on the topics of conference. Skills: Individual presentation of the results obtained.
Requirements:
Key words:student conference
ReferencesKey References: [1] Proceedings of conference SPMS 2010, FJFI, ČVUT 2010

Quantum Groups 101KVGR1 Burdík 2+0 z - - 2 -
Course:Quantum Groups 101KVGR1prof.RNDr. Burdík Čestmír DrSc.2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:Quantum Algebra was originated in the 80s in the works of professor L. D. Faddeev and the Leningrad school on the inverse scattering method in order to solve integrable models. They have many applications in mathematics and mathematical physics such as the classification of nodes, in the theory of integrable systems and the string theory.
Outline:1. Motivation, coalgebras, bialgebras and Hopf algebras. 2. Q-calculus. 3 The quantum algebra U_q(sl(2) and its representations. 4. The quantum group SL_q(2) and its representations. 5. The q-Oscillator algebras and their representations. 6. Drinfeld-Jimbo algebras, 7. Finite-Dimensional representations of Drinfeld-Jimbo Algebras. 8. Quasitriangularity and universal R- matrix.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: to acquire the mathematical basis of the quantum group theory. Abilities: able to use the quantum group theory in studying integrable systems.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in particular, the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LAP, 01LAA2, TRLA held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).

Key words:Hopf algebra, q-calculus, Drinfeld double, quasitriangularity, universal R-matrix.
ReferencesKey references: [1] Anatoli Klimyk, Konrad Schmudgen , Quantum groups and their representations.Springer-Verlag-Berlin 1997
Recommended references: [2] Podles, P.; Muller,E., Introduction to quantum groups, arXiv:q-alg/9704002. [3] Kassel, Christian (1995), Quantum groups, Graduate Texts in Mathematics,155, Berlin, New York: Springer-Verlag, MR1321145, ISBN 978-0-387-94370-1 [3] Majid, Shahn (2002), A quantum groups primer,London Mathematical Society Lecture Note Series, 292, Cambridge University Press, MR1904789, ISBN 978-0-521-01041-2, [4] Street, Ross (2007), Quantum groups, Australian Mathematical Society Lecture, Series, 19, Cambridge University Press, MR2294803, ISBN978-0-521-69524-4; 978-0-521-69524-4.

Linear Algebra A201LAA2 Dvořáková - - 2+2 z,zk - 6
Course:Linear Algebra A201LAA2Ing. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D. / prof.Ing. Šťovíček Pavel DrSc.-2+2 Z,ZK-6
Abstract:The subject is devoted to the theory of linear operators on vector spaces (mainly equipped with scalar product). In the same time we introduce the corresponding matrix theory.
Outline:Inverse matrix and operator. Permutation and determinant. Spectral theory (eigenvalue, eigenvector, diagonalization). Hermitian and quadratic forms. Scalar product and orthogonality. Metric geometry. Riesz theorem and adjoint operator.
Outline (exercises):1. Gauss method of determination of inverse matrix. 2. Different methods of determinant calculation. 3. Evaluation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization. 4. Canonical transformation of a quadratic form, determination of character of the form and signature. 5. Examples of scalar products, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, orthonormal basis. 6. Metric geometry -- calculation of distance and angles.
7. Riesz theorem and adjoint operator. Characterization of normal operators and their spectrum.
Goals:Knowledge: Mastering of the concepts of theory of linear operators and matrices, especially in spaces equiped with a scalar product, and applications of linear algebra in metric geometry.

Skills:
Ability to use these findings in further studies not only in mathematical disciplines, but also in physics, economics etc.
Requirements:Having passed the subject LAP.
Key words:Determinant, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization, quadratic and hermitian form, diagonalization, inverse operator, normal, hermitian and unitary operator.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Linear Algebra with Applications, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey,1980
[2] C. W. Curtis : Linear Algebra, An Introductory Approach, Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin, Heidelberg, Tokyo 1984.
Recommended references:
[3] P. Lancaster : Theory of Matrices, Academic Press, New York, London, 1969.

Linear Algebra B201LAB2 Ambrož - - 1+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Linear Algebra B201LAB2Ing. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.-1+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:The subject summarizes the most important notions and theorems related to the matrix theory, to the study of vector spaces with a scalar product and to the linear geometry.
Outline:Matrices and systems of linear algebraic equations - determinants - scalar product and orthogonality - eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices - linear geometry in Euclidean space
Outline (exercises):1. Solving systems of linear algebraic equations
2. Calculation of inverse matrices using the Gauss elimination
3. Permutations and determinants
4. Searching for orthogonal and orthonormal bases, application of the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization method, calculation of orthogonal projections of vectors
4. Computation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices
5. Distinct descriptions of linear manifolds and convex sets, computation of intersections of linear manifolds
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic notions from the matrix theory, notions related to the scalar product and the linear geometry from the theoretical point of view.

Abilities:
Application of the knowledge in practical problems.
Requirements:Having the exam in Linear Algebra 1 or Linear Algebra Plus passed.
Key words:Matrices, systems of linear algebraic equations, determinants, scalar product and orthogonality, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices, linear geometry in the Euclidean space
ReferencesKey references:
[1] H. G. Campbell, Linear Algebra with Applications, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 2nd edition, 1980
[2] C.W.Curtis, Linear Algebra, An Introductory Approach, Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin, Heidelberg, Tokyo, 1974, 4th edition, 1984

Recommended references:
[3] P. Lancaster, Theory of Matrices, Academic Press, New York, London, 1969

01LAL Dvořáková 3+2 z - - 2 -
Course:01LALIng. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D.----
Abstract:
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01LALA Dvořáková - zk - - 5 -
Course:01LALAIng. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D.----
Abstract:
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01LALB Dvořáková - zk - - 3 -
Course:01LALBIng. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D.----
Abstract:
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Linear Algebra with Applications01LAWA Novotná - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Linear Algebra with Applications01LAWAdoc. Novotná Jarmila-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The course deals with basic domains of linear algebra and their applications in economy and other disciplines. The language of instruction is English.
Outline:Language of mathematics. Proofs. Systems of linear equations (methods of solving, applications). Matrices (matrix operations, matrix algebra, rank, introduction to linear transformations). Vectors (vectors in geometry, algebra of vectors, length and angle, lines and planes), vector spaces (vector spaces and subspaces, linear dependence and independence, basis, dimension).
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: basic knowledge of linear algebra and its applications. The course is run in English, students? functional bilingualism is developed. Skills: Application of basic knowledge from linear algebra. Communication about a non-language subject in English.
Requirements:English: competence A2 (Common European Framework of Reference for Languages)
Key words:System of linear equations, matrix, vector space, applications, CLIL
ReferencesKey references:
[1] W.K. Nicholson: Linear Algebra with Applications. Boston: PWS Publishing Company, 1993.
[2] D. Poole: Linear Algebra. A Modern Introduction. Brooks/Cole, Thomson Learning 2003.

Recommended references:
[3] P.M. Cohn: Classic Algebra. Wiley, 1991.


Linear Programming01LIP Burdík 2+1 z,zk - - 3 -
Course:Linear Programming01LIPprof.RNDr. Burdík Čestmír DrSc.-2+1 Z,ZK-3
Abstract:We study special problems about constrained extremum problems for multivariable functions (the function is linear and the constraint equations are given by linear equations and linear inequalities).
Outline:Forms of the LP problem, duality. Linear equations and inequalities, convex polytope, basic feasible solution, complementary slackness. Algorithms: simplex, dual simplex, primal - dual, revised. Decomposition principle, transportation problem. Discrete LP (algorithm Gomory's). Application of LP in the theory of games - matrix games. Polynomial - time algorithms for LP (Khachian, Karmarkar).
Outline (exercises):1. Optimality test of feasible solution, identify the extreme point of the set of admissible solutions, build a dual problem. 2. Simplex method, dual simplex method, primary - dual simplex method. 3. Gomory algorithm for integer programming. 4. Applications in game theory.
Goals:Knowledge: The mathematical basis for systems of linear equations and inequalities. Skills: To be able to use memorized algorithms to solve specific problems of practice.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).

Key words:Admissible and optimal solution, alkaline solution, the extreme point, the simplex method, weak complementarity, integer programming.
ReferencesKey references:[1] George B. Dantzig and Mukund N. Thapa. 1997. Linear programming 1:Introduction. Springer-Verlag. [2] T.C.HU, 1970, Integer Programming and Network Flows, Addison-Weslley Publishing, Menlo Park
Recommended references: [3] George B. Dantzig and Mukund N. Thapa. 2003. Linear Programming 2: Theory and Extensions. Springer-Verlag, [4] Kattta G. Murty, Linear Programming, Wiley, 1983

Linear Programming B01LIPB Burdík 2+2 z,zk - - 4 -
Course:Linear Programming B01LIPBprof.RNDr. Burdík Čestmír DrSc.2+2 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:The aim of the lecture is the exact mathematical formulation of simplex algorithm for the linear programming problem. In exact mathematical language we study primary and dual problem. As aplications, traffic problem, integer programming and example from the game theory are studied.
Outline:1.Problem of linear programming. 2.Criterion of optimum. 3.Simplex algorithm. 4.Two simplex algorithm. 5.Example of circular in algorithm. 6.Primary and dual problems. 7.Duality theorem. 8.Farkas lemma. 9.Aplication in game theory. 10.Traffic problem. 11.Integer programming. 12.Gomory algorithm. 13.Parametric programming.
Outline (exercises):1. Problem of linear programming, optimality conditions and unlimited conditions. 2. Simplex method. 3. Dual-phase simplex method. 4. Dual simplex method. 5. An example of game theory. 6. Gomory algorithm. 7. Quadratic programming.
Goals:Knowledge: the mathematical basis for systems of linear equations and inequalities and optimaliyation. Skills: to be able to use memorized algorithms to solve specific problems of practice.
Requirements:: Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2-4, 01LA1, 01LAB2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Admissible and optimal solution, alkaline solution, the extreme point, the simplex method, weak complementarity, integer programming.
ReferencesKey references:[1] George B. Dantzig and Mukund N. Thapa. 1997. Linear programming 1:Introduction. Springer-Verlag. [2] M. C. Ferris, O. L. Mangasarian, and S. J. Wright. , Linear Programming with MATLAB, MPS-SIAM Series on Optimization 7, SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 2007. [3] T.C.HU, 1970, Integer Programming and Network Flows, Addison-Weslley Publishing, Menlo Park
Recommended references: [4] George B. Dantzig and Mukund N. Thapa. 2003. Linear Programming 2: Theory and Extensions. Springer-Verlag, [5] Kattta G. Murty, Linear Programming, Wiley, 1983

01LOM Cintula 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:01LOMIng. Cintula Petr Ph.D.----
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Calculus A201MAA2 Pelantová - - 4+4 z,zk - 10
Course:Calculus A201MAA2prof.Ing. Pelantová Edita CSc.-4+4 Z,ZK-10
Abstract:The subject is devoted mainly to the integral calculus of the real functions with one real variable and to the theory of the number series and the power series.
Outline:Continuation of differential calculus: the l´Hospital rule, Taylor´s Polynomials, Taylor´s formula; Theory of integrals: primitives, definite integral (Riemann definition), techniques of integration and application of integrals; Infinite series: criteria of convergence, operations on series, absolute and conditional convergence, real and complex power series, the Cauchy-Hadamard theorem, expansion of function into power series, summation of infinite series.
Outline (exercises):Content of excercises consists in solving problems with emphasis on using theoretical results. The domains of problems: evaluation fo limits by the l´Hospital rule, uniform continuity, approximation of function by the Taylor polynomial, technics for determination of primitive functions, evaluation of volumes and areas, expansion of function into a power series
Goals:Acquired knowledge: a rigorous construction of integral, to focus on properties of power series.
Acquired skills: application of the theoretical results in geometry, discrete mathematics and in physics.
Requirements:Succesfull completion of the course Mathematical analysis I, i.e. familiarity with differential calculus.
Key words:The Taylor polynomial, the l´Hospital rule, primitive function, the Riemann integral, series, convergence, power series
ReferencesObligatory:
[1] E. Pelantová: Matematická analýza II, skriptum ČVUT, 2007
[2] E.Pelantová, J.Vondráčková: Cvičení z matematické analýzy - Integrální počet a řady, skriptum ČVUT 2006
Optional:
[3] I. Černý, M. Rokyta: Differential and Integral Calculus of One Real Variable, Karolinum, Praha 1998
[4] I.Černý, Úvod do inteligentního kalkulu I, Academia 2005




Calculus A301MAA34 Vrána 4+4 z,zk 4+4 z,zk 10 10
Course:Calculus A301MAA3Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D. / Ing. Vrána Leopold4+4 Z,ZK-10-
Abstract:Function sequences and series, foundation of topology, and differential calculus of several variables.
Outline:Function sequences and series: Pointwise and uniform convergence, interchange rules for limits, derivatives and integrals. Fourier's series, expansion of a function into trigonometrical series, tests for pointwise and uniform convergence of trigonometrical series, completeness of trigonometric system. Topology of normed linear space, compact, connected and complete sets, fixpoint theorem. Differential calculus of several variables: directional derivatives, partial and total derivatives, mean-value theorems, extremum, manifolds, constrained extrema.
Outline (exercises):Uniform convergence. Interchange rules. Expansion of a function into trigonometrical series.
Directional derivative. Total derivative. Local extrema.

Goals:To acquaint the students with the properties of function sequences and series, expansion of a function into trigonometrical series, with an introduction to the topology, and with foundation of differential calculus of several variables.
Requirements:Basic Course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2, 01LA1, 01LAA2 held at the FNSP CTU in Prague).

Key words:Function sequences and series, Fourier's series, topological and metric space, compactness, connectness, completeness, total derivative, local extrema.

ReferencesKey reference: W.H.Fleming,Functions of Several Variables, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1966.
Recommended references: Mariano Giaquinta, Giuseppe Modica, Mathematical Analysis - An Introduction to Functions of Several Variables, Birkhäuser, Boston, 2009

Course:Calculus A401MAA4Ing. Vrána Leopold-4+4 Z,ZK-10
Abstract:Integration of functions of several variables, measure theory, foundation of differential and integral calculus on manifolds and complex analysis.

Outline:Lebesgue integral: Daniel?s construct, interchange rules, measurable sets and measurable functions. Fubini's theorem, theorem on changing variables. Parametrical integrals: Interchange theorems, Gamma and Beta functions. Differential forms: conservative, exact and closed form and their relations, potential. Line and surface integral: Green's, Gauss' and Stokes' theorem. Complex analysis: analytic functions, Cauchy's theorem, Taylor's expansion, Laurent's expansion, singularities, residue theorem.
Outline (exercises):Smooth manifolds. Constrained extrems. Differential forms. Lebesgue integral in several variables. Use of Fubini's theorem and theorem on changing variables. Use of Gamma and Beta functions for computation of integrals. Computation of integrals

Goals:To acquaint the students with foundations of Lebesgue integration and with foundations of complex analysis and its use in applications.
Requirements:Basic Course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-3, 01LA1, 01LAA2 held at the FNSP CTU in Prague).
Key words:Lebesgue integral, measurable functions and sets, Gamma and Beta functions, line and surface integral, divergence theorem, Cauchy's theorem, residue theorem.
ReferencesKey reference: W.H.Fleming,Functions of Several Variables, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1966.
Recommended references: Mariano Giaquinta, Giuseppe Modica, Mathematical Analysis - An Introduction to Functions of Several Variables, Birkhäuser, Boston, 2009

Calculus B201MAB2 Pošta - - 2+4 z,zk - 7
Course:Calculus B201MAB2doc.Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D.-2+4 Z,ZK-7
Abstract:Basic course of real analysis (integral calculus).
Outline:1. Antiderivative - basic properties, integration by parts, by substitution, antiderivative of rational and other elementary functions. 2. Newton and Riemann integrals, their relation, convergence of integral. 3. Some applications of integral - area of plane regions, length of curve, volume and surface area of solids of revolution. 4. Infinite series - sum, basic properties, convergence of series with nonnegative terms, with arbitrary terms.
Outline (exercises):1. Antiderivatives. Integration by parts, by substitution. 2. Calculus of Riemann integrals. 3. Applications of integrals. 4. Infinite series - convergence.
Goals:The goal of this course is to manage basic techniques of computing indefinite and definite integrals and examining convergence of of sequences, limits of real functions of one real variable and of differential calculus.
Requirements:Calculus 1 (01MA1).
Key words:integral calculus, real function, real variable, analysis, limit, antiderivative, Riemann integral,
infinite series
References[1] T. Apostol: Mathematical Analysis, Addison Wesley, 1974.
[2] W. Rudin: Principles of Mathematical Analysis. McGraw-Hill, Mexico, 1980.

Calculus B301MAB34 Krbálek 2+4 z,zk 2+4 z,zk 7 7
Course:Calculus B301MAB3doc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.2+4 Z,ZK-7-
Abstract:The course is devoted to functional sequences and series, theory of ordinary differential equations, theory of quadratic forms and surfaces, and general theory of metric spaces, normed and prehilbert?s spaces.
Outline:1. Functional sequences and series - convergence range, criteria of uniform convergence, continuity, limit, differentiation and integration of functional series, power series, Series Expansion, Taylor?s theorem. 2. Ordinary differential equations - equations of first order (method of integration factor, equation of Bernoulli, separation of variables, homogeneous equation and exact equation) and equations of higher order (fundamental system, reduction of order, variation of parameters, equations with constant coefficients and special right-hand side, Euler?s differential equation). 3. Quadratic forms and surfaces - regularity, types of definity, normal form, main and secondary signature, polar basis, classification of conic and quadric 4. Metric spaces - metric, norm, scalar product, neighborhood, interior and exterior points, boundary point, isolated and non-isolated point, boundary of set, completeness of space, Hilbert?s spaces.
Outline (exercises):1. Functional sequences. 2. Functional series. 3. Power series 4. Solution of differential equations. 5. Quadratic forms. 6. Quadratic surfaces. 7. Metric spaces, normed and Hilbert?s spaces.
Goals:Knowledge: Investigation of uniform convergence for functional sequences and series. Solution of differential equations. Classification of quadratic forms and surfaces. Classification of points of sets. Skills: Individual analysis of practical exercises.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus a Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2, 01LA1, 01LAB2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Function sequences, function series, differential equations, quadratic forms, quadratics surfaces, metric spaces, norm spaces, pre-Hilbert spaces
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Robert A. Adams, Calculus: A complete course, 1999,
[2] Thomas Finney, Calculus and Analytic geometry, Addison Wesley, 1996
Recommended references:
[3] John Lane Bell: A Primer of Infinitesimal Analysis, Cambridge University Press, 1998

Media and tools: MATLAB

Course:Calculus B401MAB4doc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.-2+4 Z,ZK-7
Abstract:The course is devoted properties of functions of several variables, differential and integral calculus. Furthermore, the measure theory and theory of Lebesgue integral is studied.
Outline:Differential calculus of functions of several variables - limit, continuity, partial derivative, directional partial derivative, total derivative and tangent plane, Taylor?s theorem, elementary terms of vector analysis, Jacobi matrix, implicit functions, regular mappings, change of variables, non-cartesian coordinates, local and global extremes. Integral calculus of functions of several variables - Riemann?s construction of integral, Fubiny theorem, substitution of variables. Curve and surface integral - curve and curve integral of first and second kind, surface and surface integral of first and second kind, Green and Gauss and Stokes theorems. Fundamentals of measure theory - set domain, algebra, domain generated by the semi-domain, sigma-algebra, sets H_r, K_r and S_r, Jordan measure, Lebesgue measure. Abstract Lebesgue integral - measurable function, measurable space, fundamental system of functions, definition of integral, Levi and Lebesgue theorems, integral with parameter, Lebesgue integral and his connection to Riemann and Newton integral, theorem on substitution, Fubiny theorem for Lebesgue integral.
Outline (exercises):1. Function of several variables (properties). 2. Function of several variables (differential calculus). 3. Function of several variables (integral calculus) 4. Curve and surface integral. 5. Measure Theory 6. Theory of Lebesgue integral.
Goals:Knowledge: Investigation of properties for function of severable variables. Multidimensional integrations. Curve and surface integration. Theoretical aspects of measure theory and theory of Lebesgue integral. Skills: Individual analysis of practical exercises.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus a Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2, 01MAB3, 01LA1, 01LAB2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Function of several variables, curve and surface integrals, measure theory, theory of Lebesgue integral
ReferencesKey references:
[1] M. Giaquinta, G. Modica, Mathematical analysis - an introduction to functions of several variables, Birkhauser, Boston, 2009
Recommended references:
[2] S.L. Salas, E. Hille, G.J. Etger, Calculus (one and more variables), Wiley, 9th edition, 2002

Media and tools: MATLAB

Calculus Revisited01MADR Klika - - 0+2 z - 2
Course:Calculus Revisited01MADRIng. Klika Václav Ph.D.-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:The term function - development of the term; misleading character of generality of the term; 'a statistical aspect'; discontinuous functions are still 'close' to continuous ones

Limit passage - supremum, limsup, lim have the same scheme; definition of term filter; usage of filter for all limit passages

Problem of definition of the length of curve - classical approach and its problems; term curve in analysis; the necessity of defining new terms: rectifiable curve; Lebesgue's approach (leads to necessity of definition of new integral - Lebesgue's integral); functional approach: curve length as a lower semi-continuous functional in curve space

Integral theory - historical introduction; determination of surface area of complex figure; effort for finding an universal methodology: Cauchy's approach, Riemann's approach; persisting problems lead Lebesgue to a definition of a new integral; the two fundamental Lebesgue's thoughts; Lebesgue's measure and measurability; existence (and construction) of unmeasurable set (in Lebesgue sense) and the axiom of choice; comparison of Riemann's and Lebesgue's integral and finding the essence of difference; weak spots of Lebesgue's integral; the essence of measure theory; new perspectives in integral theory
Outline:1. The term function - development of the term; misleading character of generality of the term; 'a statistical aspect'; discontinuous functions are still 'close' to continuous ones

2. Limit passage - supremum, limsup, lim have the same scheme; definition of term filter; usage of filter for all limit passages

3. Problem of definition of the length of curve - classical approach and its problems; term curve in analysis; the necessity of defining new terms: rectifiable curve; Lebesgue's approach (leads to necessity of definition of new integral - Lebesgue's integral); functional approach: curve length as a lower semi-continuous functional in curve space

4. Integral theory - historical introduction; determination of surface area of complex figure; effort for finding an universal methodology: Cauchy's approach, Riemann's approach; persisting problems lead Lebesgue to a definition of a new integral; the two fundamental Lebesgue's thoughts; Lebesgue's measure and measurability; existence (and construction) of unmeasurable set (in Lebesgue sense) and the axiom of choice; comparison of Riemann's and Lebesgue's integral and finding the essence of difference; weak spots of Lebesgue's integral; the essence of measure theory; new perspectives in integral theory

5. Introduction to symmetries of differential equations and its usage for solving ordinary differential equations.
Outline (exercises):The subject is a seminar.

The term function - development of the term; misleading character of generality of the term; 'a statistical aspect'; discontinuous functions are still 'close' to continuous ones.

Limit passage - supremum, limsup, lim have the same scheme; definition of term filter; usage of filter for all limit passages

Problem of definition of the length of curve - classical approach and its problems; term curve in analysis; the necessity of defining new terms: rectifiable curve; Lebesgue's approach (leads to necessity of definition of new integral - Lebesgue's integral); functional approach: curve length as a lower semi-continuous functional in curve space

Integral theory - historical introduction; determination of surface area of complex figure; effort for finding an universal methodology: Cauchy's approach, Riemann's approach; persisting problems lead Lebesgue to a definition of a new integral; the two fundamental Lebesgue's thoughts; Lebesgue's measure and measurability; existence (and construction) of unmeasurable set (in Lebesgue sense) and the axiom of choice; comparison of Riemann's and Lebesgue's integral and finding the essence of difference; weak spots of Lebesgue's integral; the essence of measure theory; new perspectives in integral theory
Goals:Knowledge:
To gain deeper insight into standardly used terms such as function, theory of integration, measure theory, axiom of choice etc. Further to get acquianted with symmetry methods for solving differential equations.

Skills:
Insight into standardly used terms such as function, theory of integration, measure theory, axiom of choice, solving differential equations using their symmetries
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Functional analysis (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01FA held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:the term function; filter; length of curve; theory of integration; symmetry methods for differential equations
ReferencesKey references:
[1] W. Rudin - Real and complex analysis, 3rd edition, McGraw-Hill Education (India) Pvt Ltd, 2006
[2] J. Marsden, A Weinstein - Calculus 1,2,3, Springer, 1985

Recommended references:
[1] M. Reed, B. Simon - Methods of modern mathematical physics, I. Functional analysis, Academic Press 1980
[2] P. Hydon - Symmetry Methods for Differential Equations, Cambridge university press, 2000

01MAN Pošta, Tušek 4+4 z - - 4 -
Course:01MANdoc.Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.----
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01MANA Pošta, Tušek - zk - - 6 -
Course:01MANAdoc.Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.----
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01MANB Pošta, Tušek - zk - - 4 -
Course:01MANBdoc.Ing. Pošta Severin Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.----
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Markov processes01MAPR Coupek, Krbálek - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Markov processes01MAPRdoc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.----
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Mathematics 101MAT12 Fučík 6 z 6 z 4 4
Course:Mathematics 101MAT1Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.6 Z-4-
Abstract:The course is devoted to the study of the basics of calculus of one variable. It includes an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with particular emphasis on applications in practical problems.
Outline:1. Functions and their properties.
2. Limits of functions.
3. Continuity.
4. The derivative, tangent to a curve, some differentiation formulas, derivatives of higher order.
5. Rolle's theorem, the mean value theorem (Lagrange). Extreme values, asymptotes, concavity and point of inflections, curve sketching.
6. The definite integral. The antiderivate function, indefinite integral, substitution, integration by parts. Newton's theorem, the area calculation. Primitive functions to trigonometric functions, mean integral.
7. The transcendental functions: logarithm function, e number, exponential function, hyperbolic functions.
8. Applications of the definite integral: the length of a curve, the volume and the area of a revolved curve.
Outline (exercises):1. Functions and their properties: domain of definition, range, inverse, absolute value, inequalities, quadratic inequalities, graphs, composition of functions, polynomials, division of polynomials.
2. Limits of functions: the limits of basic functions, the limits of trigonometric functions.
3. Continuity: The investigation of continuity of functions from the definition, identification of types of discontinuities.
4. Derivatives: derivative computation by definition, rules for derivatives of basic functions, tangents, higher order derivatives.
5. Rolle's theorem, the mean value theorem (Lagrange). Extreme values, asymptotes, concavity and point of inflections, curve sketching.
6. Integral calculus: the antiderivate functions, the method of substitution, the method of integration by parts, advanced techniques of integration of trigonometric functions, definite integrals, Newton's formula.
7. Transcendental functions: logarithm definition, characteristics, exponential, hyperbolic and trigonometric functions and their derivatives.
8. Applications of the definite integral: area under the graph of the function, length of a graph, volume and surface the area of a revolved curve.

Goals:Knowledge:
Elementary notions of mathematical analysis of the differential and integral calculus of functions of one real variable.

Abilities:
Understanding the basics of mathematical logic and mathematical analysis.
Requirements:
Key words:Differential calculus, integral calculus, functions of one real variable, limits, extremes of functions.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Calculus, One Variable, S.L.Salas, Einar Hille, John Wiley and Sons, New York, Chichester, Brisbane, Toronto, Singapore, 1990 (6th edition), ISBN 0-471-51749-6

Course:Mathematics 201MAT2Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.-6 Z-4
Abstract:The course, which is the continuation of Mathematics 1, is devoted to the integration techniques, improper Riemann integral, introduction to parametric curves (especially in polar coordinates), the basics of sequences and infinite series, and finally to the Taylor and power series and their applications.
Outline:1. Integration techniques.
2. The improper integral and the convergence criteria.
3. Conic sections: ellipse, hyperbole, parable.
4. Polar coordinates.
5. Parametric curves: length of a curve, tangent to a curve, surfaces, volumes and surfaces of revolution.
6. Sequences: limits of sequences, important limits, the convergence criteria.
7. Series: the convergence criteria, absolute and non-absolute convergence, alternating series.
8. Power series. Differentiation and integration of power series.
9. Taylor polynomial and Taylor series.
Outline (exercises):1. Advanced integration techniques: integrals of rational functions, partial fractions, integration of trigonometric functions.
2. Improper Riemann integral: calculating improper integrals, convergence criteria.
3. Conic sections: circle, ellipse, hyperbole, parable, conic sections identification, description of conics through the distance between points and between a point and a line.
4. Polar coordinates: the transformation of points and equations between the cartesian and polar coordinates.
5. Parametric curves: length of a curve, tangent to the curve, surfaces, volumes and surfaces of revolution.
6. Properties of sets: finding suprema and infima of sets.
7. Sequences: limits of sequences, important limits, convergence criteria.
8. Infinite series: convergence criteria, absolute and relative convergence, alternating series.
9. Power series: convergence criteria, differentiation and integration of power series, sum of infinite series.
10. Taylor polynomials and Taylor series: the expansion of important functions in power series.
Goals:Knowledge:
Advanced integration techniques, improper Riemann integral, numerical sequences, and infinite power series.

Abilities:
Understanding the basics of mathematical logic and mathematical analysis. Taylor series expansion.
Requirements:Mathematics 1.
Key words:Differential calculus, integral calculus, functions of one variable, numerical sequences, infinite series, power series, Taylor series.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Calculus, One Variable, S.L.Salas, Einar Hille, John Wiley and Sons, New York, Chichester, Brisbane, Toronto, Singapore, 1990 (6th edition), ISBN 0-471-51749-6

Mathematics 301MAT34 Humhal, Tušek 2+2 z,zk 2+2 z,zk 4 4
Course:Mathematics 301MAT3doc.RNDr. Humhal Emil CSc. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.2+2 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:The subject summarizes the most important notions and theorems related to the study of vector spaces.
Outline:1. A vector space, 2. linear dependence and independence, 3. basis and dimension, 4. subspaces of a vector space, 5. linear transformations, 6. matrices, 7. matrices of linear transformations, 8. systems of linear equations, 9. determinants, 10. orthogonality, 11. eigenvalues and eigenvectors, 12. quadratic form.
Outline (exercises):1. Examples of vector spaces.
2. Investigation of linear dependence/independence - problem with parametres.
3. Selection of basis vectors from a set of generators, completing a basis.
4. Intersection and sum of subspaces - their basis and dimension.
5. Assembling matrices of linear mappings.
6. Systems of linear algebraic equations including systems with parametres.
7. Gauss method of evaluation of inverse matrix.
8. Different methods of determinant calculation.
9. Examples scalar products, Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization.
10. Evaluation of eigen values and eigen vectors, diagonalizability.
Goals:Knowledge: Learning basic concepts of linear algebra necessary for a proper understanding of related subjects, such as analysis of functions of several variables, numerical mathematics, and so on. Skills: Applications of theoretical concepts and theorems in continuing subjects.
Requirements:Basic high school mathematics
Key words:A vector space, linear dependence, basis, dimension, subspaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, orthogonality, eigenvalues and eigenvectors,
quadratic form.
ReferencesKey references:
[4] C. W. Curtis: Linear Algebra, An Introductory Approach. Springer-Verlag 1984
Recommended references:
[5] Faddeev D. K., Faddeeva V. N.: Computional Methods of Linear Algebra. Freeman, San Francisko, London 1963

Course:Mathematics 401MAT4Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.-2+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:Linear and non-linear differential equations of the first order. Linear differential equations of higher order with constant coefficients. Multivariable calculus and its applications.
Outline:1. Linear differential equations of the first order 2. Non-linear differential equation of the first order 3. Exact and homogeneous equations. 4. Linear differential equations of higher order 5. Linear differential equation with constant coefficients 6. Quadratic forms 7. Limit and continuity of multivariable functions 8. Multivariable calculus 9. Total differential 10. Implicit function 11. Change of variables 12. Extreme values of multivariable functions 13. Multidimensional Riemann integral 14. Fubini theorem and substitution theorem.


Outline (exercises):1. Linear differential equations of the first order 2. Non-linear differential equation of the first order 3. Linear differential equations of higher order 4. Linear differential equation with constant coefficients 5. Limit and continuity of multivariable functions 6. Implicit function 7. Extreme values of multivariable functions 8. Multidimensional Riemann integral 9. Fubini theorem and substitution theorem.


Goals:Knowledge: To learn how to solve some elementary classes of differential equations, especially LDE. To become familiar with multivariable calculus.
Abilities: To apply the knowledge above to particular problems in engineering.
Requirements:Basis course in single variable calculus and linear algebra (in the extent of the courses at FNSPE, CTU in Prague: 01MAT1, 01MAT2, 01MAT3).
Key words:Differential equations, multivariable calculus.
Referenceskey references:
[1] J. Marsden, A. Weinstein: Calculus III, Springer, 1985.
recommneded references:
[2] W. Rudin: Principles of Mathematical Analysis, McGraw-Hill, 1976.

Mathematics, Examination 101MATZ12 Fučík - zk - zk 2 2
Course:Mathematics, Examination 101MATZ1Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.- ZK-2-
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Course:Mathematics, Examination 201MATZ2Ing. Fučík Radek Ph.D. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.-- ZK-2
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Requirements:
Key words:
References

Mathematical Methods in Biology and Medicine01MBI Klika 2+1 kz - - 3 -
Course:Mathematical Methods in Biology and Medicine01MBIIng. Klika Václav Ph.D.2+1 KZ-3-
Abstract:Prostorově nezávislé modely; enzymová kinetika; vybuditelné systémy (excitable systems); reakčně difuzní rovnice; řešení difuzní rovnice (ve tvaru postupných vln), vznik vzorů, podmínky pro Turingovu nestabilitu (Turing instability), vliv velikosti oblasti; Vybrané příklady z buněčné fyziologie a systémové fyziologie
Outline:1. Prostorově nezávislé modely:
jednodruhové a vícedruhové interagující modely včetně jejich analýzy (diskrétní i spojité)
2. Enzymová kinetika (zákon aktivních hmot)
3. Vybuditelné systémy (excitable systems) - model pro nervové pulsy (Fitzhugh-Nagumo)
4. Vliv prostoru (reakčně difuzní rovnice)
5. Difuzní rovnice - její odvození, řešení, možné modifikace, dosah difuze (penetration depth), dalekodosahová difuze (long-range diffusion)
6. Řešení difuzní rovnice ve tvaru postupných vln (travelling waves)
7. Vznik vzorů (pattern formation) - vznik nestabilit způsobených difuzí, podmínky pro Turingovu nestabilitu (Turing instability), vliv velikosti oblasti
8. Vybrané příklady z buněčné fyziologie (cellular physiology) a systémové fyziologie (systems physiology).
Outline (exercises):Outline of excercises follows outline of the course. For analysis of models and eventual plotting of results and solutions, symbolic mathematical programs will be used (as Mathematica, Maple).
Goals:Knowledge:
To gain deeper insight into acquired knowledge and terms from the whole study by their usage in constructing and analysis of models in biology.

Skills:
deeper insight into acquired knowledge and terms from study; formulation and analysis of models
Requirements:Course of Calculus, Linear Algebra, The equations of mathematical physics. Further, functional analysis is recommended. (In the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01MMF or 01RMF, 01FA held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:mathematical biology; discrete, continuous and spatial models; reaction-diffusion models; Turing instability
ReferencesKey references:
[1] L. Edelstein-Keshet - Mathematical Models in Biology, SIAM, 2005
[2] F. Maršík - Biotermodynamika, Academia, 1998
[3] G. de Vries, T. Hillen, M. Lewis, J. Muller, B. Schonfisch - A Course in Mathematical Biology, SIAM, 2006

Recommended references:
[1] J. Keener, J. Sneyd - Mathematical Physiology, I: Cellular Physiology, Springer, 2009
[2] W. Rudin - Analyza v komplexním a reálném oboru, Academia, Praha 2003

Modelling of Extreme Events01MEX Fabian, Kůs - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Modelling of Extreme Events01MEXprof.Ing. Fabian František CSc. / Ing. Kůs Václav Ph.D.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The course is devoted to extremal events models. Thus, events which occur with low probability, but with significant influence on behaving of described model. Risk theory, fluctuation of random sums, and fluctuation of maxima will be taught. Further distribution for modeling extremal events and various models will be introduced. Theoretical results will be applied on real data.
Outline:Aim of this course is to present mathematical models for extremal events, which occur with fairly low probability, but cause a significant influence on behaving of the modeled system. And further apply them on actual problems as real data of floods, fire, financial and assurance risks,? to predict extremal events. 1. Risk Theory: classical risk models, risk process, renewal counting processes N(t) and their properties, traditional Cramér-Lundberg estimate of tail probability, time discreet sequences. 2. Fluctuation of sums: Random walk, the law of large numbers, Poisson distribution and process as limit law of counting rare events, Hartman- Winter law of iterated logarithm, functional CLT and its softening, stable and α-stable distribution and process as limit of summing process of random variables with heavy tails, spectral representation of stable distribution. 3.Fluctuation of random maxima: Gumbel, Fréchet and Weibull distribution as limit distribution of maximal value iid variables, Cramer and Heyde law of large deviations, limit laws for maxima Mn=max(X1, X2,...,Xn), Fisher-Tippett law, Poissons approximations for P(Mn .lt. un), MDA - range of stable weak convergence of maxima Mn , application on distribution and expected value of exceeding given bound. 4. Distribution for modelling extremal values: Heavy tailed probability distribution, generalized Pareto, loggama, lognormal, heavy tailed Weibull, generalized Gumbel distribution of extremal values, parameters estimates of theses distribution and their asymptotic properties, QQ plot for filtration of true distribution of extremal values. 5. Other models and their application: Model with subexponential distribution S for heavy tailed distribution, function class Rα with regular variance of the order α in infinity, Karamat theorem. 6. application on data of floods, assurance (cumulative number of insured accident) and financial risk.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Distribution for modeling extremal events, properties of mentioned models, risk theory, fluctuation of random sums, and fluctuation of random maxima.
Skills: Application of given methods and models on real data with the aim to predict.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Probability and Statistics
Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01PRST held at the FNSPE
CTU in Prague).
Key words:Fluctuation of random sums, fluctuation of random maxima, risk theory, Pareto distribution, Gumbel distribution, Weibull distribution.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] P. Embrechts, C. Klüppelberg, T. Mikosch Modelling Extremal Events, New York Springer 1997
Recommended references:
[2] S. Coles, An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of Extreme Values Springer-Verlag London 2001.
[3] P. Embrechts, H. Schmidli , Modelling of extremal events in insurance and finance , New York, Springer 1994.

Method of Finite Volumes01MKO Kozel 1+1 kz - - 2 -
Course:Method of Finite Volumes01MKOprof.RNDr. Kozel Karel DrSc.1+1 KZ-2-
Abstract:The subject is devoted to the numerical solutions of linear partial differential equations of first and second order using the finite difference and the finite volume methods. The lecture discusses the basic properties of numerical methods for solving elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations, the modified equation and the numerical viscosity.
Outline:Finite difference method (FDM) for linear conservation law equation (explicit, implicit, upwind). Spectral criterion, CFL condition, stability of numerical schemes. Finite volume method (FVM) for non-linear conservation law equation (Lax-Wendroff, Lax-Friedrichs, Runge-Kutta, predictor-corrector, MacCormack). FVM for multidimensional conservation law equations (extension of the given numerical schemes to FVM - triangles, quadrilaterals). Compositional schemes, FVM for Navier-Stokes equations for compressible and incompressible fluids (artificial viscosity method). Discussion and presentation of problems solved by students in research projects.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Finite difference and finite volume methods and their application to elliptic, parabolic and hyperbolic equations.

Skills:
Application of FVM to solve the Navier-Stokes equations.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01NM held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Finite difference method, Finite volume method, Elliptic PDE, Hyperbolic PDE, Parabolic PDE, Navier-Stokes equations
ReferencesKey references:
P.J. Roache: Computational Fluid Dynamics, Hermosa, Alburquerque, 1976

Recommended references:
M. Feistauer: Mathematical Method in Fluid Dynamics, Longman, 1993

Finite Element Method01MKP Beneš - - 2 zk - 3
Course:Finite Element Method01MKPprof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal-2 ZK-3
Abstract:The course is devoted to the mathematical theory of the finite element method numerically solving boundary-value and initial-boundary-value problems for partial differential equations. Mathematical properties of the method are explained. The approximation error estimates are derived.
Outline:1. Weak solution of boundary-value problem for an elliptic partial differential equation.
2. Galerkin method
3. Basics and features of the FEM
4. Definition and common types of finite elements.
5. Averaged Taylor polynomial
6. Local and global interpolant
7. Bramble-Hilbert lemma
8. Global interpolation error
9. Mathematical features of the FEM and details of use
10. Examples of software packages based on FEM
Outline (exercises):Exercise is merged with the lecture and contains examples of problem formulation, examples on function bases, examples related to the interpolation theory and examples of software packages based on FEM, in particular.
Goals:Knowledge:
Weak formulation of boundary-value and initial-boundary-value problems for partial differential equations, Galerkin method, basics of FEM, error estimates, applications.

Skills:
Formulation of given problem into the form convenient for FEM, method implementation, application, explanation of results and error assessment.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Numerical Mathematics, variational methods (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA, NM, or 01MA1, 01MAB2-4, 01LA1, 01LAB2, NMET, VAME held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Boundary-value problems for partial differential equations, finite-element method, Galerkin method, Bramble-Hilbert lemma, interpolation error.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] S. C. Brenner a L. Ridgway Scott, The mathematical theory of finite element methods, New York, Springer 1994

Recommended references:
[2] K. Rektorys, Variational methods in engineering and mathematical physics, Praha, Academia 1999 (translated to English)

Media and tools:
Computer training room with OS Windows/Linux and software package FEM

Mathematical Models of Traffic Systems01MMDS Krbálek - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Mathematical Models of Traffic Systems01MMDSdoc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Mathematical Methods in Fluid Dynamics 101MMDT12 Fořt, Neustupa 2+0 z 2+0 zk 2 2
Course:Mathematical Methods in Fluid Dynamics 101MMDT1prof.Ing. Fořt Jaroslav CSc. / prof.RNDr. Neústupa Jiří CSc.2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:The contents of the course is the introduction to mathematical methods in fluid dynamice. Concretely: mathematical modelling of fundamentals physical laws by means of partial differential equations, formulation of associated boundary or initial-boundary value problems for various type sof fluids as well as various type sof flows, properties and some speciál solutions of these problems.
Outline:1. Kinematice of fluids - the rate of deformation tensor, Reynolds? transport formula, compressible or incompressible flow, respectively fluid. 2. Volume and surface forces in the fluid, stress tensor. 3. Stokesian fluid and its special cases: ideal and Newtonian fluid. 4. Basic conservation laws (of mass, momentum, energy) and their mathematical modeling (equation of continuity, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, equation of energy). 5. Second law of thermodynamics and Clausius-Duhem inequality. 6. Examples of simple solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. 7. Laws of similarity. 8. Turbulent flows. 9. Boundary layer. 10. Basic qualitative properties of the Navier-Stokes equations - strong and weak solutions, questions of existence and uniqueness in steady and non-steady case.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To learn basic principles of mathematical modelling in fluid dynamics, to learn and understand mathematical models of various type sof flows (compressible or incompressible, viscous or non-viscous, laminar or turbulent, etc.), to learn about basic methods and results in the field of qualitative properties of the Navier-Stokes equations.
Requirements:Basic courses of calculus and differential equations (in the extent of the courses 01DIFR, 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01RMF held at the FNPE
CTU in Prague).
Key words:rate of deformation tensor, stress tensor, Stokesian fluid, ideal fluid, Newtonian fluid, equation of kontinuity, Rulet equations, Navier-Stokes equations, turbulent flows, boundary layer.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J.Neustupa: Lecture notes on mathematical fluid mechanics.

Recommended references:
[2] G.K.Batchelor: An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1967.
[3] G.Gallavotti: Foundations of Fluid Mechanics, Springer 2002.
[4] W.M.Lai, D.Rubin and E.Krempl: Introduction to Continuum Mechanics. Pergamon Press, Oxford 1978.
[5] L.D.Landau and E.M.Lifschitz: Fluid Mechanics. Pergamon Press, Oxford 1959.
[6] Y.Nakayama and R.F.Boucher: Introduction fo Fluid Mechanics. Elsevier 2000.
[7] W.Noll: The Foundations of Classical Mechanics in the Light of Recent Advances in Continuum Mechanics, The Axiomatic Method. North Holland, Amstedram 1959.
[8] J. Serrin: Mathematical Principles of Classical Fluid Mechanics. In Handbuch der Physik VIII/1, ed.~C.~Truesdell and S.~Flugge, Springer, Berlin 1959.
[9] R.Temam and A.Miranville: Mathematical Modelling in Continuum Mechanics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2001.
[10] G.Truesdell and K.R.Rajagopal: An Introduction to the Mechanics of Fluids. Birkhauser 2000.

Course:Mathematical Methods in Fluid Dynamics01MMDT2prof.Ing. Fořt Jaroslav CSc. / prof.RNDr. Neústupa Jiří CSc.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The course is devoted to mathematical fundamentals of fluid mechanics models, classical and advanced finite difference and finite volume techniques applied to numerical solution of simplified problems as well as multi - dimensional problems of inviscid and viscous flow.
Outline:1. conservation laws for viscous compressible fluid flow in differential and integral forms - Navier-Stokes equations
2. Simplified models - Euler equations, potential flow, incompressible flow, 1D problem
3. The model scalar equations (transport equation, diffusion, reaction)
4. Finite volume and finite difference schemes for transport equation
5. Stability criterions for linear problems, numerical viscosity and dispersion
6. Upwind schemes and TVD methods
7. High resolution schemes for nonlinear problems with discontinuities - reconstruction, limiter
8. Extension to system of equations, approximation of diffusive term
9. Schemes for multi-dimensional problems on structured as well as unstructured grids
10. some technical applications
Outline (exercises):1. conservation laws for viscous compressible fluid flow in differential and integral forms - Navier-Stokes equations
2. Simplified models - Euler equations, potential flow, incompressible flow, 1D problem
3. The model scalar equations (transport equation, diffusion, reaction)
4. Finite volume and finite difference schemes for transport equation
5. Stability criterions for linear problems, numerical viscosity and dispersion
6. Upwind schemes and TVD methods
7. High resolution schemes for nonlinear problems with discontinuities - reconstruction, limiter
8. Extension to system of equations, approximation of diffusive term
9. Schemes for multi-dimensional problems on structured as well as unstructured grids
10. some technical applications
Goals:acquaints with models and numerical solutions of nonlinear problems described by the partial differential equations of mostly hyperbolic or parabolic-hyperbolic types and its systems.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01NM held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:partial differential equations of hyperbolic type, conservation laws, finite volume methods
ReferencesKey references:
R.J. LeVeque: Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 0 521 81087 6, 2002

Recommended references:
J. Blazek: Computational Fluid Dymanics" Principles and Applications, Elsevier, ISBN 0 08 043009 0, 2001

Methods of Mathematical Physics01MMF Šťovíček - - 4+2 z,zk - 6
Course:Methods of Mathematical Physics01MMFprof.Ing. Šťovíček Pavel DrSc.-4+2 Z,ZK-6
Abstract:The course provides an introduction to the theory of distributions with applications to solutions of partial differential equations with constant coefficients, further the Fredholm theorems are discussed for the case of a continuous kernel on a compact set as well as Sturm-Liouville operators on bounded intervals, and applications of the separation of variables method to the solution of some boundary value problems and mixed problems.
Outline:1. Definition of spaces of distributions and basic operations, periodic distributions, tensor product and convolution. 2. Tempered distributions and the Fourier transformation. 3. The generalized Laplace transformation. 4. The Fredholm theorems for integral operators with continuous kernels on a compact set. 5. Elliptic operators, Sturm-Liouville operators on a bounded interval, the Green function. 6. Solutions of a boundary value problem for the Laplace equation on a symmetric domain. 7. Solutions of a mixed problem by the separation of variables method.
Outline (exercises):1. Classification of partial differential equations of second order. 2. Exercises focused on the calculus with distributions - the limit, the differential calculus, an expansion into a Fourier series. 3. Derivative of a piece-wise smooth function. 4. Fundamental solutions for the most common partial differential operators with constant coefficients. 5. Examples of convolutions. 6. Applications of the theory of distributions to solutions of ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, the wave equation and the heat equation. 7. Examples on the generalized Fourier transformation. 8. Examples on the generalized Laplace transformation with applications. 9. Solutions of integral equations with degenerate kernels. 10. Solutions of the Sturm-Liouville equation with a right-hand side. 11. Solutions of a boundary value problem for the Laplace equation on a disk and a rectangle. 12. Solutions of a mixed problem by the separation of variables method.
Goals:Knowledge of the theory of distributions including the Fourier transformation and the Laplace transformation, knowledge of basic results concerning the solvability of integral equations with continuous kernels (Fredholm's theorems), furthermore some basic results about elliptic operators, particularly about Sturm-Liouville operators. Skills to apply this knowledge in solving the most common problems with partial differential operators as well as in solving integral equations.
Requirements:Basic courses of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Distribution, fundamental solution, the Fourier transformation, the Laplace transformation, the heat equation, the wave equation, integral equation, Sturm-Liouville operator, boundary-value problem, mixed problem.
ReferencesKey references: [1] V. S. Vladimirov: Equations of Mathematical Physics, (Marcel Dekker, New York, 1971); Recommended references: [2] P. Šťovíček: Methods of mathematical physics I, (in Czech, ČVUT, Praha, 2004), [3] L. Schwartz, Méthodes Mathematiques pour les Sciences Physiques, (Hermann, Paris, 1965)

Mathematical Modelling of Non-linear Systems01MMNS Beneš 2 zk - - 3 -
Course:Mathematical Modelling of Non-linear Systems01MMNSprof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal2 ZK-3-
Abstract:The course consists of basic terms and results of the theory of finite- and infinitedimensional dynamical systems generated by evolutionary differential equations, and description of bifurcations and chaos. Second part is devoted to the explanation of basic results of the fractal geometry dealing with attractors of such dynamical systems.
Outline:I. Introductory comments
II. Dynamical systems and chaos
1. Basic definitions and statements
2. Finite-dimensional dynamical systems and geometric theory of ordinary differential equations
3. Infinite-dimensional dynamical systems and geometric theory of ordinary differential equations
4. Bifurcations and chaos; tools of the analysis
III. Mathematical foundations of fractal geometry
1. Examples; relation to the dynamical-systems theory
2. Topological dimension
3. General measure theory
4. Hausdorff dimension
5. Attempts to define a geometrically complex set
6. Iterative function systems
IV. Conclusion - Application in mathematical modelling
Outline (exercises):Exercise makes part of the contents and is devoted to solution of particular examples from geometric theory of differential equations, linearization and Lyapunov-function method, bifurcation analysis and fractal sets.
Goals:Knowledge:
Deterministic dynamical systems, chaotic state description, geometric theory of ordinary and partial differential equations, theoretical fundaments of fractal geometry.

Skills:
Application of linearization method and Lyapunov-function method in fixed-point stability analysis, bifurcation analysis, stability of periodic trajectory, charakteristics of fractal sets and their dimension.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Diferential Equations, Functional Analysis, Variational Methods (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, DIFR, or 01MA1, 01MAB2-4, 01LA1, 01LAB2, FA1, VAME held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Evolutionary differential equations, dynamical systems, attractors, bifurcations and chaos, topological and Hausdorff dimension, iterative function systems.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] F.Verhulst, Nonlinear Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems, Springer-Verlag, Berlin 1990
[2] M.Holodniok, A.Klíč, M.Kubíček, M.Marek, Methods of analysis of nonlinear dynamical models, Academia, Praha 1986
[3] G.Edgar, Measure, Topology and Fractal Geometry, Springer Verlag, Berlin 1989

Recommended references:
[4] D.Henry, Geometric Theory of Semilinear Parabolic Equations, Springer Verlag, Berlin 1981
[5] R.Temam, Infinite Dimensional Dynamical Systems in Mechanics and Physics, Springer Verlag, Berlin 1988

Media and tools:
Course web page with selected motivation exaamples.

Mathematical Models of Groundwater Flow01MMPV Mikyška - - 2+0 kz - 2
Course:Mathematical Models of Groundwater Flow01MMPVdoc. Ing. Mikyška Jiří Ph.D.-2+0 KZ-2
Abstract:The course provides an overview of computational methods for selected groundwater flow problems. The first part of the course is devoted to mathematical formulations of these problems. The second part is aimed at selected numerical methods, emphasizing implementation issues related to these methods.
Outline:1. Basic terminology and quantities, Darcy's law and its extensions.
2. Derivation of basic equations, classical formulation of the fluid flow problem in saturated zone.
3. Brief introduction to the theory of Sobolev spaces.
4. Weak formulation of the second-order elliptic boundary value problems.
5. Existence and uniqueness of the weak solution.
6. Finite Element Method (FEM) for steady-state flow equation in saturated domain.
7. Implementation problems related to FEM. Assembling of the equations, treatment of the boundary conditions.
8. Formulation of a non-stationary problem and its numerical solution by means of method of lines.
9. Discussion of alternative methods of time discretization, several special techniques.
10. Finite Volume Method (FVM) on dual mesh for parabolic equations.
11. Comparison of FEM with FVM, relation between these two methods.
12. Computer demonstrations of several simulation tools.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Darcy's law, balance equations, formulaton of the flow problem in the saturated zone, finite element method for an elliptic boundary value problem, extension of the method to the initial-boundary value problem for a parabolic equation, assembling of the finite element systems, treatment of boundary conditions, mass lumping.

Skills: correct formulation of boundary value problems for elliptic partial differential equations, application of the finite element method including computer implementation of the method.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01NM held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Darcy law, flow in the saturated zone, weak solution, Sobolev spaces, finite element method, partial differential equation of elliptic and parabolic type, finite volume method.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J. Bear, A. Verruijt: Modelling Groundwater Flow and Polution, D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Holland, 1990.

Recommended references:
[2] P.S. Huyakorn, G. F. Pinder, Computational Methods in Subsurface Flow, Academic Press, 1983

Media and tools:
A computer with OS Linux, C language compiler and UG library.

Methods for Sparse Matrices01MRM Mikyška 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Methods for Sparse Matrices01MRMdoc. Ing. Mikyška Jiří Ph.D.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The course is aimed at utilization of sparse matrices in direct methods for solution of large systems of linear algebraic equations. The course will cover the decomposition theory for symmetric and positive definite matrices. Theoretic results will be further applied for solution of more general systems. Main features of the methods and common implementation issues will be covered.
Outline:1. Sparse matrices and their representation in a computer.
2. Algorithm of the Choleski decomposition for a symmetric and positive definite matrix.
3. Description of structure of sparse matrices and creation of fill-in during the Choleski decomposition.
4. Influence of the matrix ordering, algorithms RCM, minimum degree, nested dissection, frontal method.
5. More general systems.
6. Iterative methods and preconditioning, analysis of the stationary methods, regular decompositions.
7. Examples of simple preconditioning, preconditioning of the conjugate gradient method.
8. Incomplete LU decomposition (ILU), color ordering.
9. Multigrid methods - analysis of the Richards iteration on a model example.
10. Multigrid methods - nested iterations, methods on 2 meshes, V-cycle, W-cycle, Full Multigrid method.
11. Demonstration of selected methods on computers.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Methods of representation of the sparse matrices in a computer, creation of fill-in in the Choleski decomposition of a symmetric positive definite matrix, elimination trees, effect of matrix ordering, more general systems, iterative methods and preconditioning, stationary iterative methods, incomplete LU decomposition, introduction to the multigrid methods.

Skills: Application of the above mentioned methods to solve systems of linear algebraic equations originating from the discretization of elliptic and parabolic problems by the finite difference or finite element methods.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra, Numerical Methods and Numerical Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01NM, 01PNLA held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Sparse matrices, Choleski decomposition, fill-in, matrix ordering, iterative methods, preconditioning, incomplete LU decomposition, multigrid methods.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Y. Saad: Iterative Methods for Sparse Linear Systems, Second Edition, SIAM, 2003.

Recommended references:
[2] A. George, J. W. Liu: Computer Solution of Large Sparse Positive Definite Systems, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1981.
[3] A. Greenbaum: Iterative Methods for Solving Linear Systems, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Philadelphia 1997
[4] W. L. Briggs, Van E. Henson, S. F. McCormick, A Multigrid Tutorial, Second Editon, SIAM, 2000.

Media and tools:
A computer with OS Linux and software Octave.

Theory of Random Processes01NAH Michálek 3+0 zk - - 3 -
Course:Theory of Random Processes01NAHIng. Veverka Petr Ph.D.3+0 ZK-3-
Abstract:The course is devoted in part to the basic notions of the general theory of random processes and partially to the theory of stationary processes and sequences both weakly and strongly stationary ones.
Outline:Notion of a random peocess, Kolmogorovˇs theorem, properties of trajectories, elements of stochastic analysis, random derivative and random integral, Wiener process, Karhunen´s theorem and spectral resolution of a random process, weak stationarity, spectral density and a linear process, ergodic theorem for weakly stationary processes, question of prediction for weakly stationary processes andsequences, strong stationarity, ergodic theorems for strongly stationary processes.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Basic elements of rheora of random processes, notion of a random integral, theory of weakly stationary and strongly stationary processes. Skills: Mainly application of theory of weakly stationary processes in ingineering practice.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra, Course of Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics
Key words:random process and random sequence, staochastic analzsis and random integral, spectral resolution, weak and strong stationarity, prediction, ergodic theorems.
ReferencesKey references:
M.B. Priestley: Spectral Analysis and Time Series, Academic Press, 1981

Recommended references:
P.Z.Peebles: Probabilty, Random Variables and Random Signal Principles, McGraw-Hill , 2001

Nonlinear Programming01NELI Burdík 3+0 zk - - 4 -
Course:Nonlinear Programming01NELIprof.RNDr. Burdík Čestmír DrSc.3+0 ZK-4-
Abstract:Convex optimization has the application in many areas of natural
sciences. The lecture includes the basics of the theory convex analysis and develops algorithms for unconstrained optimization and optimization with equality-constraints. The duality theory is
studied and interior point method is formulated to be applied to inequality-constraint problems.

Outline:1. Affine and convex set, operation that preserves convexity, separating and supporting hyperplanes . 2. Convex function, basic properties and examples, operations that preserve convexity, the conjugate function, quasiconvex functions, log-concave and
log-convex functions, convexity with respect to generalized inequalities. 3. Optimization problem in
standard form, convex optimization problem, quasiconvex optimization, linear optimization, quadratic optimization, geometric programming. 4. Duality, Lagrange dual problem, weak and strong duality, optimality condition, perturbative and sensitive analysis. 5 Numerical linear algebra background, matrix structure and algorithm complexity, solving linear equation with factorized matrices, LU and Cholesky factorization, block elimination and the matrix inversion lemma. 6.
Unconstrained minimization, gradient descent method, steepest descent method, Newton method,
self-concondart function. 7. Equality constrained minimization, eliminating equality constraints,
infesable start Newton method. 8.Interior-point methods, logarithmic barrier function and central parth, barrier method. 9. Linear complementarity problem and quadratic programming.

Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: mathematical basis convex optimization. Abilities: able to use nonlinear optimization algorithms in practice.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in particular, the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LAP, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Nonlinear optimization, convex sets, convex functions, Lagrange duality, Kuhn-Tuckerovy conditions, unrestricted optimization, optimization
with constraints.
ReferencesKey references: [1] Stephen Boyd and Lieven Vandenberghe, Convex optimization, Cambridge University Press 2004.
Recommended references: [2] Fletcher: Practical methods of optimization, Wiley, 2000. [3]Luenberger: Linear and Nonlinear Programming, Addison-Wesley, 1984. [3] Stoer, Witzgall: Convexity and Optimization in Finite Dimensions, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1970. [4]Bazaraa, Sherali, Shetty: Nonlinear Programming: Theory and Algorithms, Wiley, 1993, L mat 1360

Design of Experiments01NEX Hobza 2+1 kz - - 4 -
Course:Design of Experiments01NEXIng. Franc Jiří / Ing. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.2+1 KZ-4-
Abstract:For processes of any kind that have measurable inputs and outputs, Design of Experiments (DOE) methods help us in the optimum selection of inputs for experiments, and in the analysis of results. The course consists of selected methods of DOE such as: completely randomized design, randomized block design, Latin squares design and two level factorial experiments.
Outline:1. Introduction to design of experiments and analysis of their results
2. Completely randomized single-factor design: introduction of model with fixed effects, tests of equality of means, choice of the sample size, check of suitability of model, test of equality of variances, transformation to obtain homoscedasticity, model with random effects, estimates of model parameters, and confidence intervals
3. Methods of multiple comparisons: LSD method, Bonferroni method, Scheffé method, Tukey method
4. Randomized block design: definition of model, test of equality of effects, power of test, choice of the sample size, estimate of the lost values
5. Latin and Graeco-Latin squares designs: test of equality of effects, verification of suitability of model, residua, multiple comparisons
6. Two level factorial experiments: statistical models and their properties for 2^2, 2^3 a 2^k designs
Outline (exercises):1. Statistical hypothesis testing
2. Comparison of several treatment meana - analysis of variance
3. Randomized block design
4. Latin and Graeco-Latin square design
5. Factorial experiments
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic notions and principles of design and analysis of experiments.

Skills:
Application to solution of practical problems, i.e. ability to design an experiment for a concrete problem and to do its statistical evaluation.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAB3, 01MAB4 and 01PRST held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Design of experiments, completely randomized experiment, randomized block experiment, multiple comparison, Latin squares, Graeco-Latin squares, two level factorial experiment.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] D. C. Montgomery: Design and analysis of experiments, Wiley 2008

Recommended references:
[2] J. Antony: Design of Experiments for Engineers and Scientists, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2003

Numerical Methods 201NME2 Beneš - - 2+0 kz - 2
Course:Numerical Methods 201NME2prof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal-2+0 KZ-2
Abstract:The course is devoted to numerical solution of boundary-value problems and intial-boundary-value problems for ordinary and partial differential equations. It explains methods converting boundary-value problems to initial-value problems and finite-difference methods for elliptic, parabolic and first-order hyperbolic partial differential equations.
Outline:I. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations - boundary-value problems
1. Shooting method
2 Method of transformation of a boundary-value problem
3. Method of finite differences
4. Solution of non-linear equations
II. Numerical solution of partial differential equations of the elliptic type
1. Finite-difference method for linear second-order equations
2. Convergence and the error estimate
3. Method of lines
III. Numerical solution of partial differential equations of the parabolic type
1. Method of finite differences for one-dimensional problems
2. Method of finite differences for higher-dimensional problems
3. Method of lines
IV. Numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws
1. Formulation and properties of hyperbolic conservation laws
2. Simplest finite-difference methods
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Numerical methods based on transformation of a boundary-value problem to an initial-value problem, finite-difference method for ODE's and PDE's.

Skills:
Application of given methods in particular examples in physics and engineering including computer implementation and error assessment.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2-4, 01LA1, 01LAB2, 12NMET held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Boundary-value problems and initial-boundary-value problems for differential equations, shooting methods, finite-difference methods, energy methods giving properties of numerical schemes, explicit and implicit methods, conservation laws.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] A.A. Samarskij, Theory of Difference Schemes, CRC Press, New York, 2001
[2] I. Babuška, M. Práger, E. Vitásek, Numerical Processes in Differential Equations, ... Methods, Springer-Verlag, New York 1994
[3] R.J. LeVeque, Finite Difference Methods for Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, Steady State and Time Dependent Problems, SIAM, 2007
[4] R.J. LeVeque, Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems, Cambridge University Press, 2002

Recommended references:
[5] E. Godlewski a P.-A. Raviart, Numerical approximation of hyperbolic systems of conversation laws, New York, Springer 1996

Media and tools:
Computer training room with Windows/Linux and programming languages C, Pascal, Fortran.

Neural Computers and Their Applications01NSAP Hakl, Holeňa 3+0 zk - - 4 -
Course:Neural Computers and Their Applications01NSAPIng. Hakl František CSc. / Doc. Ing. RNDr. Holeňa Martin CSc.3+0 ZK-4-
Abstract:Introduction into the theory of artificial neural networks, some important kinds of neural networks, threshold vectors analysis of binary nets, neural networks evaluation of Boolean functions, neural networks from the point of view of function approximation, neural networks from the point of view of probability theory, numerical properties of learning algorithms.
Outline:Introduction to neural networks, basic models, analysis of binary neural networks, approximations possibilities of neural networks, Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension of NN, learning theory and neural networks, numerical aspects of learning algorithms, applications of probabilistic theory in neural networks, fuzzy sets approach to neural networks.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Make the students acquainted with theoretical and mathematical fundamentals of important kinds of neural networks.
Requirements:
Key words:neural network architecture, neural networks learning, important kinds of neural networks, numerical properties of
learning algorithms universal approximation capability of neural networks, probabilistic approach to neural
networks
References[1] H. White. Artificial Neural Networks: Approximation and Learning Theory. Blackwell Publishers, Cambridge, 1992 [2] Vwani Roychowdhury, Kai-Yeung Siu, Alon Orlitsky. Theoretical Advances in Neural Computation and Learning. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1994

Numerical Simulations of Convection Problems01NSPP Kozel - - 1+1 zk - 2
Course:Numerical Simulations of Convection Problems01NSPPprof.RNDr. Kozel Karel DrSc.-1+1 KZ-2
Abstract:Students will be acquainted with the 2D and 3D numerical simulations of flow problems described by potential, inviscid and viscous flow. It is a transonic flow around a wing profile, in a 2D and 3D lattice, in 2D and 3D channels of different shape, in the boundary layer, and in the modeling of cardiovascular problems. Some cases of turbulent flow simulations are also mentioned.
Outline:Basic flow models (potential, inviscid, viscous). The Euler and Navier-Stokes equations for compressible and incompressible flow. The formulation of given flow problems including initial and boundary conditions. Basic numerical schemes for solving problems of external and internal aerodynamics, boundary layer, biomechanics, etc. The numerical simulation of the given problems (including turbulent flows) with numerical examples 2D and 3D.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge of 2D and 3D models and numerical schemes of viscous and inviscid fluid flow described by Navier-Stokes equations.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01NM held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Finite difference method, Finite volume method, Elliptic PDE, Hyperbolic PDE, Parabolic PDE, Navier-Stokes equations
ReferencesKey references:
P.J. Roache: Computational Fluid Dynamics, Hermosa, Alburquerque, 1976

Recommended references:
M. Feistauer: Mathematical Method in Fluid Dynamics, Longman, 1993

Numerical Mathematics 101NUM1 Oberhuber 3+1 z,zk - - 4 -
Course:Numerical Mathematics 101NUM1Ing. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D.3+1 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:The course introduces to numerical methods for solving the basic problems arising from technical and research problems. The accent is put on a good understanding of the root of theoretical methods.
Outline:1. Recapitulation of necessary concepts from linear algebra and functional analysis.
2. Direct and iterative methods for solving linear algebraic equations. Matrix inversion.
3. Solving the partial eigenvalue problem.
4. Solution of the full eigenvalue problem.
5. Solving the equation f (x) = 0
6. Systems of nonlinear algebraic and transcendental equations.
7. Interpolation functions by polynomials.
8. Numerical calculation of derivatives.
9. Numerical calculation of integral
Outline (exercises):1. Practicing rules of operations with triangular matrices, proofs of theorems on decompositions of square matrices, derivation of decomposition formulae.
2. Proof of Schur decomposition theorem. Consequences for special classes of matrices.
3. Examples of solution of systems of linear algebraic equations and matrix inversion using direct methods.
4. Examples of solution of systems of linear algebraic equations using iterative methods.
5. Examples of application of methods for solution of extremal eigenvalues and complete eigenvalue problem.
6. Examples of solution of non-linear algebraic and transcendental equations and their systems. Numerical approximation of integrals.
Goals:Knowledge: Correct understanding of the theoretical basis for numerical algorithms is accented. Skills: Applications of numerical methods for solution of basic mathematical tasks originated from technical or scientific problems.
Requirements:
Key words:Direct methods, iterative methods, eigenvalue problem, systems of equations, interpolation, numerical calculation of integrals

ReferencesKey references:
[4] A. Quarteroni, R. Sacco, F. Saleri: Numerical Mathematics. Springer-Verlag 2000
Recommended references:
[5] A. S. Householder: The Theory of Matrices in Numerical Analysis. Blaisdell Publishing Company 1965

Numerical Mathematics 201NUM2 Beneš - - 2+1 z,zk - 3
Course:Numerical Mathematics 201NUM2prof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal-2+1 Z,ZK-3
Abstract:The course is devoted to numerical solution of boundary-value problems and intial-boundary-value problems for ordinary and partial differential equations. It explains methods converting boundary-value problems to initial-value problems and finite-difference methods for elliptic, parabolic and first-order hyperbolic partial differential equations.
Outline:I. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations - boundary-value problems
1. Shooting method
2 Method of transformation of a boundary-value problem
3. Method of finite differences
4. Solution of non-linear equations
II. Numerical solution of partial differential equations of the elliptic type
1. Finite-difference method for linear second-order equations
2. Convergence and the error estimate
3. Method of lines
III. Numerical solution of partial differential equations of the parabolic type
1. Method of finite differences for one-dimensional problems
2. Method of finite differences for higher-dimensional problems
3. Method of lines
IV. Numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws
1. Formulation and properties of hyperbolic conservation laws
2. Simplest finite-difference methods
Outline (exercises):1. Taylor expansion in the context of difference formulas with particular properties
2. Normalized conversion method
3. Nonlinear difference schemes.
4. Definition of the weak solution of an elliptic boundary-value problem.
5. Relation of difference approximations and of the finite-volume method
Goals:Knowledge:
Numerical methods based on transformation of a boundary-value problem to an initial-value problem, finite-difference method for ODE's and PDE's.

Skills:
Application of given methods in particular examples in physics and engineering including computer implementation and error assessment.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01NM held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Boundary-value problems and initial-boundary-value problems for differential equations, shooting methods, finite-difference methods, energy methods giving properties of numerical schemes, explicit and implicit methods, conservation laws.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] A.A. Samarskij, Theory of Difference Schemes, CRC Press, New York, 2001
[2] I. Babuška, M. Práger, E. Vitásek, Numerical Processes in Differential Equations, Wiley, London 1966
[3] R.J. LeVeque, Finite Difference Methods for Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, Steady State and Time Dependent Problems, SIAM, 2007
[4] R.J. LeVeque, Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems, Cambridge University Press, 2002

Recommended references:
[5] E. Godlewski a P.-A. Raviart, Numerical approximation of hyperbolic systems of conversation laws, New York, Springer 1996

Media and tools:
Computer training room with Windows/Linux and programming languages C, Pascal, Fortran.

Numerical Software01NUSO Fürst 2+0 z - - 3 -
Course:Numerical Software01NUSOdoc.Ing. Fürst Jiří Ph.D.2+0 Z-3-
Abstract:The course deals with the implementation of several numerical methods in existing software libraries. The attention will be paid to libraries for solution of problems of linear algebra with full and sparse matrices, and to the solution of ODE and PDE
Outline:1 - BLAS and LAPACK libraries, solution of linear systems with full matrix, 2 - ScaLAPACK library, parallel solution of linear systems with full matrix, 3 - UMFPACK and MUMPS libraries, solution of linear systems with sparse matrices, 4 - Graph/mesh partitioning using METIS, 5 - PETSc library: parallel iterative solvers for linear systems, 6 - PETSc: solution of ODE, 7 - PETSc: solution of PDE, 8 - OpenFOAM library for FVM
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Overview of existing software packages for numerical analysis. Skills: Application of existing software packages for solution of particular numerical problems.
Requirements:Basic numerical mathematics and parallel algorithmes and architectures (in the extent of courses 01NMA and 01PAA held at the FNSPE CPU in Prague)
Key words:Direct solver, sparse solver, iterative solver, parallel computing, ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, programming
References[1] Lapack users'guide, http://www.netlib.org/lapack/lug/index.html,
[2] PETSc documentation, http://www.mcs.anl.gov/petsc/petsc-as/documentation/index.html

Parallel Algorithms and Architectures01PAA Oberhuber - - 3 kz - 4
Course:Parallel Algorithms and Architectures01PAAIng. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D.-3 KZ-4
Abstract:This course deals with the parallel data processing. It is important in situations when one processing unit (CPU) is not powerful enough to finish given task in reasonable time. When designing parallel algorithms, good knowledge of the parallel architectures is important. Therefore these architectures are studied as a part of this course too.
Outline:1. Introduction
2. Sequential architectures
3. Parallel architectures
4. Communication networks
5. Communication operations
6. Introduction to CUDA
7. OpenMP / MPI
8. Analysis of parallel algorithms
9. Sorting algorithms
10. Matrix algorithms
11. Graph algorithms, Monte-Carlo methods 12. Combinatorial search

Outline (exercises):1. Programming in CUDA
2. OpenMP / MPI
3. Analysis of parallel algorithms
4. Sorting algorithms
5. Matrix algorithms
6. Graph algorithms, Monte-Carlo methods
7. Combinatorial search

Goals:Knowledge:
Parallel architectures, basic types of parallel architectures, communication in parallel architectures, programming standards OpenMP, MPI, CUDA/OpenCL, sorting algorithms, matrix algorithms, graph algorithms, Monte-Carlo methods, analysis of the parallel algorithms.
Skills:
The students will learn how to choose appropriate parallel architecture for given problem, how to design proper parallel algorithm, analyze it and derive its efficiency and how to implement the parallel algorithm.
Requirements:Basic algorithms, programing in C/C++.
Key words:Parallel architectures, parallel algorithms, arhitectures with shared memory, architectures with distributed memory, interconnection networks, basic communication operations, OpenMP, MPI, GPGPU, sorting, matrices, graphs, numerical computations, graph algorithms, Monte-Carlo methods, combinatorial search.
ReferencesKey references:
Grama A., Karypis G., An Introduction to Parallel Computing: Design and Analysis of Algorithms

Recommended references:
CUDA Programming guide

Media and tools:
Computer lab

Programming of Peripherals Devices01PERI Čulík 2+0 z - - 2 -
Course:Programming of Peripherals Devices01PERIIng. Čulík Zdeněk2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:Memory organization, input and output ports, computer bus. Software libraries for computer peripherals, 3D graphic libraries.
Principles of peripherals device drivers.
Outline:1. Memory and I/O addressing
2. Interrupt requests and interrupt controllers
3. Keyboard (BIOS, I/O ports, principles of simple keyboard driver), serial communication, video adapters.
4. Examples of OpenGL graphical programs. Introduction to Open Inventor library
5. Disk devices (IDE and SCSI interfaces)
6. Overview of device drivers for Windows and Linux operating systems
7. Real time operating systems.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Overview of methods used for peripheral programming. Introduction to software libraries for concrete peripherals devices.

Skills:
To develop software application which optimally uses hardware resources.
Requirements:
Key words:Peripherals devices, device drivers.
References[1] A. Rubini, J. Corbet: Linux Device Drivers, O Reilly, 2001
[2] D. Shreiner, T. Davis, M, Woo, J. Neider: OpenGL Programming Guide: The Official Guide to Learning OpenGL, Pearson Education, 2003
[3] T. Shanley, D. Anderson: PCI System Architecture, Addison-Wesley, 1999
[4] Friedheim Schmidt: The SCSI Bus and IDE Interface: Protocols, Applications and Programming, Addison-Wesley, 1997
[5] http://oss.sgi.com/projects/inventor/

Mainframe Programming01PMF Oberhuber - - 2 z - 2
Course:Mainframe Programming01PMFIng. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D.-2 Z-2
Abstract:In this course the basics of programming in z/OS are explained namely the programming in assembler. Basic instructions, macros, I/O operations, DLL library loading and some other topics are discussed.
Outline:1. Introduction to assembleru
2. Structure of instructions
3. Data types
4. Inputs and outputs
5. Data conversions
6. Tables and loops
7. Logical operations
8. Subroutines
9.-10. Macros
11.-12. Dynamic modules
Outline (exercises):2. Structure of instructions
3. Data types
4. Inputs and outputs
5. Data conversions
6. Tables and loops
7. Logical operations
8. Subroutines
9.-10. Macros
11.-12. Dynamic modules
Goals:Knowledge:
Structure of the assembler instructions, data types, inputs and outputs, data conversions, tables and loops, logical operations, subroutines, macros, dynamic modules.

Skills:
Student will learn how to write simple programs in assembleru for the system z/OS. The student will be able to easier understand specialize training courses of software developing companies.
Requirements:Basic operations with the mainframe on the level of the course Introduction to the mainframe.
Key words:Mainframe, z/OS, assembler, HLASM, macros.
ReferencesKey references:
K. McQuillen, A. Prince, MVS Assembler Language, 1987, Mike Murach.

Recommended references:
IBM, IBM System/370, Principles of Operation, IBM, 1975.

Media and tools:
Computer lab, mainframe account.

Probabilistic Learning Models01PMU Hakl 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Probabilistic Learning Models01PMUIng. Hakl František CSc.2+0 ZK-2-
Abstract:Introduction into the theory PAC learning model, VC-dimension of finite sets, Sauer, Cover and Radon's lemma,
VC-dimension of composed mappings, application of VC-dimension for lower bound of necessary patterns, analysis of
properties of delta rule based learning processes, PAC learning model extensions and PAO learning, Fourier
coefficients search for Boolean functions.
Outline:1. PAC learning introduction
2. Concepts and concept classes
3. PAC learning in finite case
4. Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension (Sauer's lemma, Cover's lemma, Radon's lemma)
5. VC-dimension of finite set systems
6. VC-dimension of union and intersection
7. VC-dimension of linear concepts
8. Application of Cover?s lemma
9. Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension of composed mapping
10. Pattern complexity and VC-dimension
11. Minimal number of patterns and PAC learning
12. Delta rule learning algorithm
13. Lover bound for maximal steps of delta rule algorithm
14. Polynomial learning and pattern dimension
15. Almost optimal solution of the cover set problem
16. Polynomial learning and conceptual complexity
17. Probabilistic learning algorithms
18. Probabilistic approximation of Fourier expansion
19. Probabilistic search of Fourier coefficients of Boolean functions
20. Probably approximately optimal learning
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Make the students acquainted with theoretical and mathematical fundamentals of PAC-like learning algorithms.
Requirements:
Key words:Probably approximately correct learning, Vapnik-Cervonenkis dimension, pattern complexity, delta rule algorithm,
cover set problems, probabilistic Fourier coefficient search
ReferencesKey references:
F. Hakl, M. Holeňa. Úvod do teorie neuronových sítí. Ediční středisko ČVUT, Praha, 1997.

Recommended references:
Vwani Roychowdhury, Kai-Yeung Siu, Alon Orlitsky. Theoretical Advances in Neural Computation and Learning. Kluwer
Academic Publishers, 1994.

Martin Anthony and Norman Biggs. Computational Learning Theory. Press
Syndicate of the University of Cambridge, 1992.

A. Blumer, A. Ehrenfeucht, D. Haussler, and M. K. Warmuth. Learnabil-
ity and the Vapnik-Chervonenkis Dimension. Journal of the Association for
Computing Machinery, 36:929-965, oct 1989.

Advanced Methods of Numerical Linear Algebra01PNLA Mikyška 2+0 zk - - 3 -
Course:Advanced Methods of Numerical Linear Algebra01PNLAdoc. Ing. Mikyška Jiří Ph.D.2+0 ZK-3-
Abstract:Representation of real numbers in computers, behaviour of rounding errors during numerical computations, sensitivity of a problem, numerical stability of an algorithm. We will analyse sensitivity of the eigenvalues of a given matrix and sensitivity of roots of systems of linear algebraic equations. Then, the backward analysis of these problems will be performed. The second part of the course is devoted to the methods of QR-decomposition, least squares problem, and to several modern Krylov subspace methods for the solution of systems of linear algebraic equations and the Lanczos method for approximation of the eigenvalues of a symmetric square matrix.
Outline:1. Introduction, basic terminology, representation of numbers in computers
2. Standard arithmetics IEEE, behaviour of rounding errors in computations in finite precision arithmetics, forward and backward analysis
3. Similarity transforms, Schur's theorem, measurement of the distances between spectra of two matrices
4. Theorem on sensitivity of the spectra of general matrices
5. Sensitivity of eigenvalues of diagonalizable and normal matrices, backward analysis of the eigenvalue problem
6. Sensitivity of roots of systems of linear algebraic equations, backward analysis of the solutions to the systems of algebraic equations
7. QR-decompositions and orthogonal transformations
8. Householder transform
9. Gramm-Schmidt orthogonalization process
10. Krylov space methods - introduction, Arnoldi's algorithm, method of generalized minimal residual (GMRES) for solution of systems of linear algebraic equations
11. Lanczos algorithm, approximation of eigenvalues of a symmetric matrix
12. Overview of the Krylov space methods for solution of systems of linear algebraic equations
13. Preconditioning of the iterative methods, examples of simple preconditioners
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Floating point arithmetics, rounding errors in the finite precision arithmetics, backward analysis and its application to estimation of the approximation error, sensitivity and backward analysis of matrix spectra and solution of systems of the linear algebraic equations, methods for QR decomposition, Arnoldi algorithm, basic Krylov subspace methods for solution of systems of linear algebraic equations (GMRES, CG, MinRes, BiCG, QMR), and the Lanczos method for approximation of eigenvalues of a symmetric matrix.

Skills: To choose a suitable method for solution of a system of linear algebraic equations or evaluation of a spectrum of a given matrix and to estimate error of the obtained approximation.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01NM held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Floating point arithmetics, rounding errors, sensitivity, numerical stability, backward analysis, QR decomposition and orthogonal transformations, least squares problem, Krylov subspace methods.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] D. S. Watkins: Fundamentals of Matrix Computations, J. Willey, New York, 1991

Recommended references:
[2] B. N. Parlett: Symmetric Eigenvalue Problem, Prentice Hall, Engl. Cliffs, 1988
[3] G. H. Golub, C. F. van Loan: Matrix Computations, John Hopkins, 1997.

Advanced Numerical Methods01PNM Beneš - - 2+0 kz - 2
Course:Advanced Numerical Methods01PNMprof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal-2+0 KZ-2
Abstract:The course is devoted to advanced numerical solution of boundary-value problems and intial-boundary-value problems for ordinary and partial differential equations. It explains the shooting method, advanced finite-difference methods and finite-volume method for nonlinear elliptic, parabolic and first-order hyperbolic partial differential equations.
Outline:I. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations - boundary-value problems
1. Shooting method
2 Method of finite differences for non-linear equations
II. Numerical solution of partial differential equations of the elliptic type
1. Finite-difference method for nonlinear second-order equations
2. Convergence and the error estimate
3. Finite volume method
III. Numerical solution of partial differential equations of the parabolic type
1. Method of finite differences for nonlinear evolution problems
2. Method of lines
3. Finite volume method
IV. Numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws
1. Formulation and properties of hyperbolic conservation laws
2. Simplest finite-difference methods
3. Finite volume method
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Numerical methods for nonlinear boundary-value problems, finite-difference method for ODE's and PDE's, finite-volume method.

Skills:
Application of given methods in particular examples in physics and engineering including computer implementation and error assessment.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Ordinary Differential Equations (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2-4, 01LA1, 01LAB2, 12NME1 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Boundary-value problems and initial-boundary-value problems for differential equations, shooting methods, finite-difference methods, energy methods giving properties of numerical schemes, explicit and implicit methods, conservation laws, finite volume method.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] A.A. Samarskij, Theory of Difference Schemes, CRC Press, New York, 2001
[2] I. Babuška, M. Práger, E. Vitásek, Numerical Processes in Differential Equations, ... Methods, Springer-Verlag, New York 1994
[3] R.J. LeVeque, Finite Difference Methods for Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, Steady State and Time Dependent Problems, SIAM, 2007
[4] R.J. LeVeque, Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems, Cambridge University Press, 2002

Recommended references:
[5] E. Godlewski a P.-A. Raviart, Numerical approximation of hyperbolic systems of conversation laws, New York, Springer 1996

Media and tools:
Computer training room with Windows/Linux and programming languages C, Pascal, Fortran.

Computer Graphics 101POGR12 Strachota 2 z 2 z 2 2
Course:Computer Graphics 101POGR1Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.2 Z-2-
Abstract:The first part of the two-semester "Computer Graphics" course is devoted to the specifics of digital display devices spanning from history up to the state of the art technologies. Further, a survey of fundamental problems in 2D computer graphics is given together with their solutions. Focus is put on mathematical description of problems and explanation of the corresponding algorithms using knowledge previously obtained in a variety of subjects available at FNSPE. The final part of the course covers the applications of computer graphics approaches in the process of authoring scientific documents and presentations.
Outline:1. Computer graphics hardware
2. Human vision, color perception and representation
3. Raster graphics algorithms
4. Computational geometry
5. Image transforms (interpolation, warping, morphing)
6. Formats and algorithms for image data compression and storage
7. Graphical user interfaces
8. WWW and multimedia technologies
9. Computer graphics in scientific document authoring
Outline (exercises):The exercises are integrated in the lectures and are devoted to solving the simpler of the particular problems in 2D computer graphics, e.g. digital dithering algorithms, boundary fill, convex hull determination, LZW compression, etc.
Goals:Knowledge:
Proper grasp of the fundamental problems of 2D graphics as well as a notion of cutting edge contemporary technologies. Solid theoretical and practical foundations for further development of computer graphics methods and their customization to particular needs.

Skills:
Immediate ability to apply the approaches of computer graphics in multimedia presentations, scientific visualization and data processing. Complex design and implementation of the corresponding software instruments. Capability to produce high-quality outputs of scientific research (articles, slides, posters) by means of professional typesetting technologies.
Requirements:-
Key words:Display devices, GPU, color spaces, raster graphics algorithms, computational geometry, warping, morphing, graphical image formats, data compression, GUI, multimedia.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J. D. Foley, A. van Dam, S. K. Feiner, J. F. Hughes: Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice. Addison Wesley, 1997.

Recommended references:
[2] J. Vince: Mathematics for Computer Graphics. Springer Verlag, London, 2006.
[3] E. Pazera: Focus on SDL. Premier Press, Cincinnati, 2003.

Media and tools:
Computer lab with Windows/Linux OS and C, C++, Java, C# programming languages, MS Visual Studio, Qt development framework. SDL library.

Course:Computer Graphics 201POGR2Ing. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D. / Ing. Strachota Pavel Ph.D.-2 Z-2
Abstract:The second part of the two-semester "Computer Graphics" course begins with a brief introduction to signal theory in the context of aliasing - a phenomenon ubiquitous in computer graphics. Further, a well structured survey of fundamental problems in 3D computer graphics is given together with their solutions, from the description of a 3D scene to its realistic rendering. Focus is put on mathematical description of problems and explanation of the corresponding algorithms using knowledge previously obtained in a variety of subjects available at FNSPE. The algorithm implementation aspect such as data structures design etc. is also a matter of concern.
Outline:1. Introduction to signal theory
2. The objectives of 3D computer graphics
3. Representing curves and surfaces
4. Solid modeling
5. Procedure-based modeling techniques
6. Matrix transforms
7. Projections
8. Visible surface determination
9. Illumination and shading
10. Texturing
11. Ray tracing and photorealistic rendering methods
Outline (exercises):The exercises are integrated in the lectures and are devoted to solving the simpler of the particular problems in 3D computer graphics, e.g. cubic spline rasterization, algorithms for regularized Boolean operations on octrees, fractal terrain modeling by means of the Terragen software tool, geometrical transforms in homogeneous coordinates, silhouette algorithm in visible surface determination, the elementary version of the ray tracing method, etc.
Goals:Knowledge:
Proper grasp of the fundamental problems of 3D graphics as well as a notion of cutting edge contemporary technologies. Solid theoretical and practical foundations for further development of computer graphics methods and their customization to particular needs.

Skills:
Immediate ability to apply the approaches of computer graphics in multimedia presentations, scientific visualization and data processing. Complex design and implementation of the corresponding software instruments.
Requirements:Completing the "Computer graphics 1" course is strongly recommended though not strictly obligatory.
Key words:Signal theory, aliasing, curves and surfaces, solid modeling, procedural and fractal modeling, projections, visible surface determination, illumination and shading, ray tracing, radiosity, photon maps.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J. D. Foley, A. van Dam, S. K. Feiner, J. F. Hughes: Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice. Addison Wesley, 1997.

Recommended references:
[2] J. Vince: Mathematics for Computer Graphics. Springer Verlag, London, 2006.
[3] A. S. Glassner: An Introduction to Ray Tracing. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, San Francisco, 2002.
[4] M. F. Cohen, J. R. Wallace: Radiosity and Realistic Image Synthesis. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, San Francisco, 1993.
[5] P. Prusinkiewicz, A. Lindenmayer: The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants. Springer Verlag, 1990.

Media and tools:
Computer lab with Windows/Linux OS and C, C++, Java, C# programming languages, MS Visual Studio, Qt development framework. SDL library, OpenGL and DirectX APIs, Blender, 3dsMax.

Computers and Natural Language 101POPJ12 Bojar, Zeman 0+2 z 0+2 z 2 2
Course:Computers and Natural Language 101POPJ1Mgr. Zeman Daniel0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:Basic course of computational processing and understanding of natural languages. Automatic methods of morphological and syntactic analysis including modern statistical methods of result disambiguation will be discussed. Two-level morphology, tagging and language models, Viterbi algorithm, grammars, chart parsing, probabilistic grammars.
Outline:1. Introduction, overview of applications. 2. The Perl programming language. 3. Corpora, first applications. 4. Linguistic terminology, layers of natural language processing. 5. Accuracy evaluation. 6. Dictionaries and morphological tags. 7. Two-level morphology, morphonology. 8. Morphology and context-free grammars. 9. Morphology and unification grammars. 10. Tagging (disambiguation of morphological analysis). 11. Spellchecking. 12. Constituency syntax. 13. Dependency syntax.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge of basic methods of natural language processing from tokenization to the level of syntactic parsing. Ability to implement some of them in Perl. Ability to work with annotated corpora and existing freely available tools such as taggers and parsers.
Requirements:
Key words:natural language processing, annotated corpus, tokenization, morphological analysis, two-level morphology, tagging, context-free grammar, unification grammar, parsing, dependency syntax
ReferencesKey references:
James Allen: Natural Language Understanding. The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Company, Inc.; Redwood City, California,1994. ISBN 0-8053-0334-0.

Recommended references:
Larry Wall, Tom Christiansen, Randal Schwartz: Programming Perl. O'Reilly, 1996. ISBN 1-56592-149-6. http://www.perl.com/

Richard Sproat: Morphology and Computation. Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1992. ISBN 0-262-19314-0.

Jan Hajič: Unification Morphology Grammar (PhD thesis). Univerzita Karlova, Praha, 1994

Stuart Shieber: An Introduction to Unification-based Approaches to Grammar. CSLI Lecture Notes No. 4, Stanford, California, 1986

Sandra Kübler, Ryan McDonald, Joakim Nivre: Dependency Parsing. Morgan and Claypool Publishers; 2009. ISBN 978-1-59829596-2.

Christopher D. Manning, Hinrich Schütze: Foundations of Statistical Natural Language Processing. The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1999. ISBN 0-26213-360-1.

Media and tools:computer training room with access to the internet and to Linux machines, Perl programming language 5.8 or higher, dataprojector

Course:Computers and Natural Language 201POPJ2Mgr. Bojar Ondřej / Mgr. Zeman Daniel-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:The goal of the course is to get acquainted with the broad topic of machine translation (MT). Machine translation is a challenging task that can serve as a good example for modeling of systems as complex as natural languages. We cover several rather different approaches to the task as well as issues related to automatic and manual evaluation of translation quality.
Outline:1. Metrics of machine translation quality (both manual and automatic). 2. Translation and language models, generic log-linear model. Search space of partial hypotheses. Phrase-based translation. 3. Parallel texts, alignment and extraction of "translation dictionaries? from parallel data. 4. Morphological preprocessing, factored phrase-based translation. 5. Model optimization (minimum error rate training). 6. Constituency trees in MT, parsing-based MT. 7. Dependency trees in MT. 8. Deep-syntactic trees in MT. 9. Presentation of student's experiments.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge of approaches to machine translation (statistical phrase-based and hierarchical, tree-based models, deep-syntactic machine translation), log-linear model and model optimization, search space of partial hypotheses, methods of manual and automatic MT evaluation.
Ability to apply one of the covered methods to real data. Ability to design an experiment and make use of large open-source tools to carry out the experiment. Ability to discuss the results and present them both in written and oral form. Ability to cooperate in a small team.
Requirements:
Key words:Natural language processing, parallel corpora, machine translation, phrase-based translation, hierarchical translation, syntax-based translation, evaluation of machine translation quality.
ReferencesKey references:

Philipp Koehn: Statistical Machine Translation. Cambridge University Press. ISBN: 978-0521874151, 2009.

Advanced Probability01POPR Hobza - - 2+0 z - 2
Course:Advanced Probability01POPRIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.----
Abstract:The subject is devoted to advanced Theory of probability and statistics on measure-theoretic level for general distributions of random variables. We deal with sample and integral characteristics of random variables and convergence criteria. Further, the theory of statistical model estimation and testing is extended for parametric and nonparametric cases.
Outline:Measurable spaces, sigma-fields, probability measures. Borel sets, measurable functions, random variables and probability distributions. Radon-Nikodym theorem. Product measure, integral w.r.t. probability measure. Expectation of random variables, Lp space. Characteristic function and its properties, applications. Kolmogorov law of large numbers. Weak convergence, its properties, Lévy theorem, Slutsky lemma, central limit theorems (CLT), Lindeberg-Feller fundamental theorem, Lindeberg condition, Berry-Esseen theorem, Multi-dimensional limit theorems. Populations, natural extensions in sample spaces, The problem of point statistical estimation, parametric and nonparametric caase, optimality criteria, asymptotic normality, Glivenko-Cantelli lemma, Vapnik-Chervonenkis inequality. Kernel density estimates and its properties.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
In frame of the advanced course in Probability and Statistics on measure-theoretic level, to provide students with the knowledge necessary for the following future subjects using probability and stochastic models. To give a deeper insight into the field.

Abilities:
Orientation in majority of standard and advanced notions of the probability theory and statistics and capabilities of theoretical and practical applications in actual probabilistic computation.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus (in the extent of the courses 01MAA3-4 or 01MAB3-4 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague), further 01PRST.
Key words:Spaces of random variables, distribution measure, integration with respect to probability measure, charakteristic function, multi-dimensional convergence, statistical point estimation, testing hyphothesis, nonparametric models.
ReferencesKey:
[1] Rényi A., Foundations of probability, Holden-Day Inc., San Francisco, 1970.
[2] Schervish M.J., Theory of Statistics, Springer, 1995.
Recommended:
[3] Shao J., Mathematical Statistics, Springer, 1999.
[4] Lehmann E.L., Point Estimation, Wiley, N.Y., 1984.
[5] Lehmann E.L., Testing Statistical Hypotheses, Springer, N.Y., 1986.

Probability and Mathematical Statistics 101PRA12 Kůs 4+2 z,zk 2+0 zk 6 2
Course:Probability and Mathematical Statistics 101PRA1Ing. Kůs Václav Ph.D.4+2 Z,ZK-6-
Abstract:The subject is devoted to the introduction to Theory of probability and statistics on measure-theoretic level for discrete models, continuous distributions and general distributions of random variables. We deal with sample an integral characteristics of random variables and variants of limit theorems are derived (LLN, CLT). This knowledge is further applied to the statistical processing of observations and statistical parametric model estimation.
Outline:Axioms of probability space, sigma-fields, probability measure. Dependent and independent events.Borel sets, measurable functions, random variables and probability distributions. Radon-Nikodym theorem. Discrete and absolutely continuous distributions, examples. Product measure, integral w.r.t. probability measure. Expectation of random variables, moments and central moments. Lp space, Schwarz inequality, Chebyshev inequality, covariance. Characteristic function and its properties, applications. Almost sure convergence, in Lp, convergence in probability. Law of large numbers (Chebyshev, Kolmogorov,...). Weak convergence, its properties, Lévy theorem, Slutsky lemma, central limit theorems (CLT), Lindeberg-Feller fundamental CLT, Lindeberg condition, Berry-Esseen theorem. The multivariate normal distribution with its properties. Cochran's theorem and the independence of the sample mean and sample variance. Introduction to statistical inference, populations, natural extensions in sample space, the existence of independently distributed sequences of observations. The problem of point statistical estimation, parametric and nonparametric caase, optimality criteria, asymptotic normality. Sample moments and other empirical characteristics.
Outline (exercises):1. Axioms of probability space 2. Dependent and independent events. 3. Particular discrete distributions, examples (Binomial, Poisson, Pascal, Geometric, Hypergeometric, Multinomial distribution). 4. . Particular absolute continuous distributions, examples (Uniform, Gamma, Beta, Normal, Exponencial,...). 5. Distributions based on transformations (Student, Chi-squared, Fisher-Snedecer) and quantiles. 6. Computations of characteristic functions, expectations and moments of particular distributions. 7. Covariance and Corelation of selected random variables. 8. Law of large numbers and Central limit theorems - asymptotics and usefullness. 9. Two dimensional normal distribution 10. Point statistical estimation - examples of sample estimates and their consistency and unbiasedness, sample moments.
Goals:Knowledge: In frame of the basic course in Probability and Statistics on measure-theoretic level, to provide students with the knowledge necessary for the following future subjects using probability and stochastic models. To give a deeper insight into the field.
Abilities: Orientation in majority of standard notions of the probability theory and basic statistics and capabilities of practical applications in actual probabilistic computation.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus (in the extent of the courses 01MAA3-4 or 01MAB3-4 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Probability measure, events, random variables, distributions, expectation, charakteristic function, convergence, limit theorems, Gauss distribution, statistical point estimation, consistency, unbiasedness.
ReferencesKey:
[1] Rényi A., Foundations of probability, Holden-Day Inc., San Francisco, 1970.
[2] Schervish M.J., Theory of Statistics, Springer, 1995.
Recommended:
[3] Shao J., Mathematical Statistics, Springer, 1999.
[4] Lehmann E.L., Point Estimation, Wiley, N.Y., 1984.
[5] Lehmann E.L., Testing Statistical Hypotheses, Springer, N.Y., 1986.

Course:Probability and Mathematical Statistics 201PRA2Ing. Kůs Václav Ph.D.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The subject is devoted to the statistical techniques for estimation and testing within parametric and nonparametric models such as Maximum likelihood principle, Uniformly most powerful tests, Goodness of fitness tests of models, confidence regions, etc. We focus on real practical applications of these statistical techniques in frame of the specific examples.
Outline:Unbiased minimum variance estimates, Fisher information matrix, Rao-Cramér inequality, Bhattacharrya inequality. Moment estimators, Maximum likelihood principle, consistency, asymptotic normality and efficiency of MLE. Testing of simple and composite hypotheses. The Neyman-Pearson lemma. Uniformly most powerful tests. Randomized testing, generalized Neyman-Pearson lemma The likelihood ratio test, t-test, F-test. Nonparametric models, empirical distribution and density function, their properties, histogram and kernel density estimate. Pearson goodness of fit test, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Confidence sets and intervals, pivotal quantities, acceptance regions, Pratt theorem.
Outline (exercises):1.Parameter Estimation for specific distributions. 2. Testing hypotheses in normal model, t-test, F-test applied to data sets from steel industry. 3. Randomized testing - task from epidemiology. 4. Variance analysis - task from agriculture. 5. Nonparametric models - goodness of fit test for data from chemical industry. 6. Confidence intervals in normal models - application to temperature data set.
Goals:Knowledge: In frame of the course, to provide students with the knowledge necessary for the following future subjects using stochastic models. To give a deeper insight into the field in the area of point statistical parameter estimation and testing statistical hypothesis in parametric and nonparametric probabilistic models.
Abilities: Orientation in majority of standard notions of the statistics and capabilities of practical applications in actual stochastic computations.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAA3-4 or 01MAB3-4, 01PRA1 nebo 01PRST held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Unbiased estimators, information matrix, Moment estrimators, Maximum likelihood principle, efficiency, Statistical hypothesis, simple and composite hypotheses, most powerful tests, likelihood ratio test, nonparametric models, empirical distribution, histogram, kernel estimate, goodness of fitness, confidence sets and intervals.
ReferencesKey:
[1] Anděl J., Základy matematické statistiky, MatFyzPress, Praha, 2005.
[2] Schervish M.J., Theory of Statistics, Springer, 1995.
Recommended:
[3] Shao J., Mathematical Statistics, Springer, 1999.
[4] Lehmann E.L., Point Estimation, Wiley, N.Y., 1984.
[5] Lehmann E.L., Testing Statistical Hypotheses, Springer, N.Y., 1986.

Programmer's Practicum01PROP Bauer 0+2 z - - 2 -
Course:Programmer's Practicum01PROPIng. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D.0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:The purpose of this course is to acquire good programming habits which will help in writing of clean code, i.e. such that is easy to comprehend by others and suitable for adding new functionality. Using specific examples, the students get familiar with naming conventions, and continue through writing project documentation, principles of defensive programming, debugging, up to creating object-oriented design, design patterns and refactoring.
Outline:I. The basics of writing clean code
1. Formatting
2. Data structures
3. Naming of variables
4. Rules for writing functions
5. Handling of errors, exceptions
6. Comments
II. Object-oriented design
1. Namespaces
2. Class organization
3. Inheritance and abstraction
4. Special types of classes
III. Code development
1. Coding conventions
2. Specification and design
3. Testing of code
4. Refactoring
5. Documentation
Outline (exercises):The excercise is an integral part of the course, its contents is given by the subject's sylabus.
Goals:Knowledge:
How to write clean code, coding conventions. Principles of defensive programming, code management and guidelines for refactoring. How to write documentation. Code structure and functionality, creating of consistent blocks and their testing. Object-oriented design, open for changes. Development of clean and comprehensible code.

Skills:
The student learns to write transparent code, which is easy to understand by other developers, flexible in terms of adding new functionality and easy for debugging.
Requirements:C/C++ programming, object-oriented programming
Key words:Clean code, coding conventions, defensive programming, test driven development, object-oriented design, refactoring, documentation.
ReferencesKey references:

[1] R.C. Martin, Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftmanship, Prentice Hall 2009

[2] S. McConnell, Code Complete, Second Edition, Microsoft Press, 2004

Recommended references:

M. Fowler, Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code, Addison-Wesley, 2002

Probability and Statistics01PRST Hobza 3+1 z,zk - - 4 -
Course:Probability and Statistics01PRSTIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.3+1 Z,ZK-4-
Abstract:It is a basic course of probability theory and mathematical statistics. The probability theory is build gradually beginning with the classical definition and continuing till the Kolmogorov definition. The notions as random variable, distribution function of random variable and characteristics of random variable are treated and basic limit theorems are stated and proved. On the basis of this theory the basic methods of mathematical statistics such as estimation of distribution parameters and hypothesis testing are explained.
Outline:1. Classical definition of probability, statistical definition of probability, conditional probability and Bayes's theorem
2. Random variables, distribution functions, discrete and continuous random variables, independent random variables, characteristics of random variable
3. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem
4. Point estimation, confidence intervals
5. Tests of statistical hypotheses, goodness of fit tests
Outline (exercises):1. Combinatorial rules, classical and geometric probability
2. Conditioned probability and related theorems
3. Distribution function of random variable, discrete and continuous random variables, transformation of random variables
4. Characteristics of random variables, mainly expectation and variance, central limit theorem
5. Point estimation of parameters
6. Hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests
Goals:Knowledge:
Fundamentals of probability theory and overview of simple statistical methods.

Skills:
Application of probability theory to solution of concrete examples, statistical analysis and processing of real data, testing hypothesis about the sets of real data.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus (in the extent of the courses 01MAB3, 01MAB4 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Random variable, distribution function, probability mass function, probability density, independence of random variables, expectation, variance, central limit theorem, point estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] H. G. Tucker: An introduction to probability and mathematical statistics. Academic Press, 1963

Recommended references:
[2] J. Shao: Mathematical statistics, Springer, 1999

Probability and Statistics B01PRSTB Hobza 3+1 kz - - 4 -
Course:Probability and Statistics B01PRSTBIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.3+1 KZ-4-
Abstract:It is a basic course of probability theory and mathematical statistics. The probability theory is build gradually beginning with the classical definition and continuing till the Kolmogorov definition. The notions as random variable, distribution function of random variable and characteristics of random variable are treated and basic limit theorems are stated and proved. On the basis of this theory the basic methods of mathematical statistics such as estimation of distribution parameters and hypothesis testing are explained.
Outline:1. Classical definition of probability, statistical definition of probability, conditional probability and Bayes's theorem
2. Random variables, distribution functions, discrete and continuous random variables, independent random variables, characteristics of random variable
3. Law of large numbers, central limit theorem
4. Point estimation, confidence intervals
5. Tests of statistical hypotheses, goodness of fit tests
Outline (exercises):1. Combinatorial rules, classical and geometric probability
2. Conditioned probability and related theorems
3. Distribution function of random variable, discrete and continuous random variables, transformation of random variables
4. Characteristics of random variables, mainly expectation and variance, central limit theorem
5. Point estimation of parameters
6. Hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests
Goals:Knowledge:
Fundamentals of probability theory and overview of simple statistical methods.

Skills:
Application of probability theory to solution of concrete examples, statistical analysis and processing of real data, testing hypothesis about the sets of real data.

Requirements:Basic course of Calculus (in the extent of the courses 01MAB3, 01MAB4 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Random variable, distribution function, probability mass function, probability density, independence of random variables, expectation, variance, central limit theorem, point estimation of parameters, hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests
ReferencesKey references:
[1] H. G. Tucker: An introduction to probability and mathematical statistics. Academic Press, 1963

Recommended references:
[2] J. Shao: Mathematical statistics, Springer, 1999

LaTeX - Publication Instrument01PSL Ambrož - - 0+2 z - 2
Course:LaTeX - Publication Instrument01PSLIng. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:The course is devoted to the basics and facilities of computer typography, particularly to the system LaTeX
Outline:1) LaTeX - philosophy of the programme, typesetting of the text, paragraphs
2) Typesetting and structuring of the documents, tables in LaTeX
3) Mathematics in LaTeX
4) Advanced mathematical constructions
5) Graphics, figures, bibliographic data and databases
6) Beamer - package for typesetting transparencies
Outline (exercises):1) Installation of the LaTeX system
2) Structuring on the document, text and paragraphs
3) Itemization environments, tables
4) Mathematics in LaTeX
5) AMSLaTeX package
6) References
7) Including the graphics files
Goals:Knowledge:
Computer typography, facilities of the LaTeX system.

Skills:
Use of the system LaTeX for typesetting of a (typographically fair) document.
Requirements:
Key words:Typography, LaTeX.
ReferencesReferences:
[1] J. Rybička, LaTeX pro začátečníky, Konvoj, 1999.
[2] T. Oetiker et al.,
The Not So Short Introduction to LaTeX2e,
www.ctan.org/tex-archive/info/lshort/english/lshort.pdf

Recommended references:
[3] H. Kopka, P.W. Daly, Guide to LaTeX, Addison-Wesley Professional, (2003)

Teching tools:
Computer lab (Windows/Unix) with LaTeX system.

Windows Programming01PW Čulík 2+0 z - - 2 -
Course:Windows Programming01PWIng. Čulík Zdeněk2+0 Z-2-
Abstract:Simple graphical programs for MS Windows. Basic editing controls. File input and output. User defined components, dynamic type identification and reflection.
Outline:1. Graphical user interface development in C# language
2. Programming of basic controls
3. Functions and classes for image processing
4. Storing information in XML format
5. Access to relational databases
6. Programing simple components for Visual Studio development environment
7. Principles of dynamic data type identification and using of reflection in graphical development environments
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Programming language C#, platform .NET, graphical user applications for MS Windows.

Skills:
Design and develop application using C# programming language.
Requirements:
Key words:Win32, .Net, C#, Visual Studio.
References[1] C. Petzold, Windows Programming, Microsoft Press, 1996
[2] C. Petzold, Programming Microsoft Windows Forms, Microsoft Press, 2005
[3] C. Petzold, .NET Book Zero, http://www.charlespetzold.com/dotnet/
[4] http://msdn.microsoft.com/

Regression Data Analysis01REGA Víšek 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Regression Data Analysis01REGAprof.RNDr. Víšek Jan Ámos CSc.2+0 ZK-2-
Abstract:Classical and robust regression analysis, estimators, diagnostics, time series, dynamic model.
Outline:Linear model, the least squares, estimator minimizing sum of absolute values of residuals. The best linear unbiased estimator of regression coefficients - orthogonality condition and sphericality (homoscedasticity), consistency. Asymptotic normality of the estimator of regression coefficients. The best unbiased estimator of regression coefficients. Coefficient of determination, role of intercept, significance of explonatory variables. Confidence intervals testing submodels, Chow test. Statistical packages, possibilities, inputs and outputs, reliability, interpretation of results, White test of heteroscedasticity, index plot. Normality test, Theil residuals, tests of good fit, K-S test, normal plot. Colinearity, condition number, Farrar-Glauber test, redundancy, ridge regression, estimator with linear restrictions. AR, MA, AR(I)MA, invertibilty and stationarity conditions. Smoothing the linear envelope of trends, moving averages. Seasonal and cyclic components, randomness test. Efficient estimate of AR(1), MA(1), AR(2), MA(2), Prais-Winston, ochrane-Orcutt. Robust regression, M-estimators, qualitative and quantitative robustness, influence function, influential points (outliers, leverage points). The least median of squares, the trimmed least squares and the least trimmed squares, the weighted least squares and the least weighted squares, algorithms, aplications. Philosophical ideas of mathematical modelling.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To continue in statistical lectures and to offer one of the most powerful tool for data modelling. To make students familiar with theoretical and practical aspects of topic and open them the point of view of statistician and econometrician, classical and robust approach.
Requirements:
Key words:Regression model, cross-sectinal and panel data, classical and robust estimators.
ReferencesKey references:
Statistical data analysis, in Czech. Publishing house of the Czech Technical University in Prague, 1997. (187 pages, ISBN 80-01-01735-4)

Recommended references:
Atkinson, A.C. (1985): Plots, Transformations and Regression: An Introduction to Graphical Methods of Diagnostic Regression Analysis. Oxford: Claredon Press.

Baltagi, B. H. (2001): A Companion to Theoretical Econometrics,Massachusetts, Oxford: Blackwell.

Drapper, N. R., Smith, H (1998): Applied Regression Analysis, New York: J.Wiley.

Judge, G. G., W. E. Griffiths, R. C. Hill, H. Lütkepohl, T. C. Lee (1982): Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Econometrics. New York: J.Wiley.

Wooldridge,J.M. (2001): Econometric Analysis of Cross section and Panel Data.
The MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. and London, England.

The Equations of Mathematical Physics01RMF Krbálek 2+4 z,zk - - 6 -
Course:The Equations of Mathematical Physics01RMFdoc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.4+2 Z,ZK-6-
Abstract:The subject of this course is solving integral equations, theory of generalized functions, classification of partial differential equations, theory of integral transformations, and solution of partial differential equations (boundary value problem for eliptic PDE, mixed boundary problem for eliptic PDE).
Outline:1. Introduction to functional analysis - factor space, Hilbert space, scalar product, orthonormal basis, fourier series, orthogonal polynoms, hermite operators, operator spectrum and its properties, bounded operators, continuous operators, eliptic operators
2. Integral equations - integral operator and its properties, separable kernel of operator, sequential approximation method, iterated degenerate kernel method, Fredholm integral equations, Volterra integral equations.
3. Classification of partial differential equations - definitions, types of PDE, transformations of partial differential equations into normal form, classification of PDE, equations of mathematical physics.
4. Theory of generalized functions - test functions, generalized functions, elementary operations in distributions, generalized functions with positive support, tensor product and convolution, temepered distributions.
5. Theory of integral transformations - classical and generalized Fourier transformation, classical and generalized Laplace transform, applications.
6. Solving differential equations - fundamental solution of operators, solutions of problems of mathematical physics.
7. Boundary value problem for eliptic partial differential equation.
8. Mixed boundary problem for eliptic partial differential equation.
Outline (exercises):1. Hilbert space
2. Linear operators on Hilbert spaces
3. Integral equations
4. Partial differential equations
5. Theory of generalized functions
6. Laplace transform
7. Fourier transform
8. Fundamental solution of operators
9. Equations of mathematical physics
10. Eliptic differential equations
11. Mixed boundary problem
Goals:Get acquainted with theory of generalized functions and its application to solving partial differential equations including mixed boundary problem.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and selected topics in mathematical analysis (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA2, 01VYMA held at the FNSPE
CTU in Prague).
Key words:Mathematical methods in physics, distributions, integral transfomations, partial differential equations
ReferencesKey References:
P. Stovícek: Methods of Mathematical Physics : Theory of generalized functions, CVUT, Praha, 2004. (in czech),
V.S. Vladimirov : Equations of Mathematical Physics, Marcel Dekker, New York, 1971
Č. Burdík, O. Navrátil : Rovnice matematické fyziky, Česká technika - nakladatelství ČVUT, 2008

Recommended literature:
L. Schwartz - Mathematics for the Physical Sciences, Dover Publication, 2008
I. M. Gel'fand, G. E. Shilov, Generalized Functions. Volume I: Properties and Operations, Birkhäuser Boston, 2004

Image Processing and Pattern Recognition 101ROZ1 Flusser, Zitová - - 2+2 zk - 4
Course:Image Processing and Pattern Recognition 101ROZ1prof.Ing. Flusser Jan DrSc. / RNDr. Zitová Barbara Ph.D.-2+2 ZK-4
Abstract:An introductory course on image processing and pattern recognition. Major attention is paid to image sampling and quantization, image preprocessing (noise removal, contrast stretching, sharpening, and de-blurring, Wiener filtering, blind deconvolution), edge detection, morphology and geometric transformations and warping. Numerous applications and experimental results are presented in addition to the theory.
Outline:image sampling and quantization, Shannon theorem, aliasing
basic image operations, histogram, contrast stretching, noise removal, image sharpening
linear filtering in the spatial and frequency domains, convolution, Fourier transform
edge detection, corner detection
image degradations and their modelling, inverse and Wiener filtering, restoration of motion-blurred and out-of-focus blurred images
image segmentation
mathematical morphology
image registration and matching
Outline (exercises):Image visualisation and Matlab basics
Fourier transform
Noise and denoising methods
Edge detectors and histogram equalisation
Image registration
Morphology
Goals:to teach students introduction to image processing
Requirements:Passing linear algebra and calculus
Key words:image analysis, edge detection, denoising methods, image preprocessing and registration, morphology
ReferencesKey references:
Gonzales R. C., Woods R. E., Digital Image Processing (3rd ed.), Addison-Wesley, 2008

ecommended references:
Pratt W. K.: Digital Image Processing (3rd ed.), John Wiley, New York, 2001

Media and tools: a complete set of lecture slides and excersises are available at http://zoi.utia.cas.cz/ROZ1

01ROZP2 Flusser 2+1 zk - - 4 -
Course:01ROZP2prof.Ing. Flusser Jan DrSc. / RNDr. Zitová Barbara Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Project Management of Software Projects01RSWP Rozsypal 0+2 kz - - 2 -
Course:Project Management of Software Projects01RSWPIng. Rozsypal Pavel0+2 KZ-2-
Abstract:The course Project management of software projects is dedicated to an explanation of general ideas, rules and procedures which are common to many projects of very diverse character. The course structure corresponds to a lifecycle of typical projects including many other aspects which have to be taken into account in the course of their management. Specific attention is paid to software project management and to IT projects in general. Interdisciplinary view of project management is emphasized.
Outline:1. Basic notions of project management (PM) and their relationships (project vs. product and their lifecyles, program, ongoing operation, project triangle). 2. Project organization and project manager (project organization types, project stakeholders, conflict resolution, managerial styles, motivation theories). 3. PM processes and knowledge areas (3 dimensions of PM - phases, processes, knowledge areas; basic breakdown structures - products, work performed, team organization). 4. Selection and initialization of projects (finances - cashflow, profit, time value of money, methods of project financial assessment). 5. Decision methods (decision trees, AHP - analytic hierarchy process - a multi-criteria decision method). 6. Legal aspects of projects (legislation environment in Czechia - Civic and Commercial Codes, Intelectual Property Code, contract for work and its basic attributes, product licensing, Open source, pricing types, subcontractors). 7. Project schedule (activities and their sequencing, Gantt diagrams, precedence diagrams and their graph formalization, critical path method, topological ordering and transitive reduction of precedence graphs, PERT method). 8. Project budget (effort, productivity, schedule optimization, project baseline, estimate methods, price anatomy). 9. Project change management (Earned value method, integrated change management, product acceptance). 10. Risk management (risks and their attributes, risk events, risk identification and analysis, risk response planning, risk monitoring and response). 11. SW project lifecycle (typical phases and detailed steps, process and data models, solution architecture, implementation, product rollout and its maintenance).
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Students should acquire an ability to understand principles and methodologies of project management, they should be able to plan and analyze simple projects in their fundamental aspects: from managerial and technical up to legal and financial ones.
Requirements:Basic knowledge of general mathematics roughly at the level of first two years of FJFI (some linear algebra, graphs, basic notions of probability theory).
Key words:Project management, project, product, program, project triangle, schedule, precedence diagram, decision tree, AHP, crititical path method, PERT, project plan, baseline, earned value, contract for work, licencing, Open source, project budget, change management, risk management, process model, data model, architecture, implementation.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Pavel Rozsypal, Texts for the course: Project management of software projects (lessons 1 - 11 and other supporting materials), available at FJFI Department of Mathematics web pages: www.km.fjfi.cvut.cz/vyuka/rswp

Recommended references:
[2] A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK? Guide) - Fourth Edition, PMI (Project Management Institute) 2008,
[3] John R. Schuyler, Risk and Decision Analysis in Projects - Second Edition, PMI (Project Management Institute) 2001,
[4] Steve McConnell, Software Estimation: Demystifying the Black Art, Microsoft Press 2006
[5] John R. Adams, et. al., Principles of Project Management, PMI (Project Management Institute), 1997

Media and Tools: For basic orientation lectures and internet access are suficcient. Useful supplementary tools are MS Excel (or other spreadsheet), in some cases MS Project.

Special Functions and Transformations in Image Analysis01SFTO Flusser - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Special Functions and Transformations in Image Analysis01SFTOprof.Ing. Flusser Jan DrSc.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The course broadens topics of the courses ROZ1 and ROZ2. Main attention will be paid to several special functions and transformations (especially moment functions and wavelet transform) and their use in selected tasks of image processing - edge detection, noise removal, recognition of deformed objects, image registration, image compression, etc. Both the theory and practical applications will be discussed.
Outline:geometric moments, definitions and basic properties
complex moments
moment invariants to rotation and scaling
moment invariants to affine transform
moment invariants to convolution/blurring and combined invariants
orthogonal polynomials and orthogonal moments (Legendre moments,
Fourier-Mellin moments, Zernike moments)
discrete moments and their effective calculation
introduction to wavelet transform (WT)
edge and corner detection by means of the WT
image denoising by means of the WT
image registration by means of the WT
wavelet-based image compression (block quantizing)
other applications of the WT in image processing

Outline (exercises):
Goals:theory of moments and its application in digital image processing. An introduction to vavelet theory and an application of wavelets in digital image processing. An practical application of introduced algorithms (edge detection, denoising, image registration, object recognition, compression).
Requirements:passing of ROZ1 and ROZ2
Key words:moment theory, wavelets, object recognition, denoising, image compression, image registration
ReferencesKey references:
Jan Flusser, Tomáš Suk and Barbara Zitová, Moments and Moment Invariants in Pattern Recognition, Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2009 (317 pp., ISBN 978-0-470-69987-4)

Recommended references:
S. Mallat: A Wavelet Tour of Signal Processing, Academic Press, 2008

Media and tools: a complete set of lecture slides and excersises are available at http://zoi.utia.cas.cz/ PGR013

Computer Networks 101SITE12 Minárik 1+1 z 1+1 z 2 2
Course:Computer Networks 101SITE1Ing. Minárik Miroslav1+1 Z-2-
Abstract:Understanding the history and present network (LAN, WAN, use the principles and technologies). Architecture of reference model ISO/OSI. Network protocols, practical exercises with TCP/IP communications. Internet services - mail, remote access, www. Secure communication, tunneling.
Directory services, certificates, certification authorities, public key infrastructure (PKI). Use in practice. Network security - firewalls (packet filters, proxies, gateways, NAT, DMZ), practical exercises.
(According to the interest - the serial control lines, modems)
Outline:1st Past and present of computer networks. Topology, used principles and technologies.
2nd The reference model ISO/OSI
3rd Network protocols, TCP/IP communication
4th Internet services. Remote access, electronic mail (formats, transmission, access to the mailbox)
5th Security of services, tunneling
Outline (exercises):1st Access to e-mail, formatting and transmission
2nd Secure encrypted communication channel, tunneling
3rd TCP / IP communication (option C, C + +, Java, etc.)
4th Remote access (telnet, ssh, XWindows, Remote Desktop, VNC)
Goals:Knowledge: use of secure channels, principles of electronic mail, directory services and their use, public key infrastructure, firewall principles.
Skills: Build a secure transmission channel, work with certificates, basic routing and firewall settings.
Requirements:Programming basics and Algorithmization (in the extent of the courses ZPRO, ZALG held at the FNSPE
CTU in Prague).
Key words:Formatting and transmission of electronic mail (MIME, SMTP, IMAP, POP).
Secure communications (encryption, ssh, ssl, stunnel).
TCP / IP communications.
Directory services (LDAP, LDIF).
Public Key Infrastructure, an electronic signature.
Firewall.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Scott Oaks, Java security, O'Reilly, 2001

Recommended references:
[3] William R. Cheswick, Steven M. Bellovin, Aviel D. Rubin, "Firewalls and Internet security: repelling the wily hacker?, ADDISON-WESLEY, 2003
[4] Gert De Laet, Gert Schauwers, "Network security fundamentals?, Cisco Press, 2004
[5] William Stallings, "Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice?, Prentice Hall, 2006
Interneto:
[6] http://www.protocols.com/
[7] standardy "RequestForComments? (http://www.ietf.org/)

Media and tools:
Computer training room with Windows/Linux and programming languages Java, C, C++, Pascal.


Course:Computer Networks 201SITE2Ing. Minárik Miroslav-1+1 Z-2
Abstract:Understanding the history and present network (LAN, WAN, use the principles and technologies). Architecture of reference model ISO/OSI. Network protocols, practical exercises with TCP/IP communications. Internet services - mail, remote access, www. Secure communication, tunneling.
Directory services, certificates, certification authorities, public key infrastructure (PKI). Use in practice. Network security - firewalls (packet filters, proxies, gateways, NAT, DMZ), practical exercises.
(According to the interest - the serial control lines, modems)
Outline:6th Network and computer security (firewalls: packet filter, proxies, gateways, NAT), virtual private network
7th Directory services, identify real world entities, ASN1, LDAP, LDIF
8th Certificates, CA, public key infrastructure
9th Electronic Signature
Outline (exercises):5th Access to the directory service, LDAP LDIF
6th Simple CA based on OpenSSL
7th Encryption, digital signature (the Java JCE)
8th Interconnection networks, routing, firewall (filtering, NAT)
Goals:Knowledge: use of secure channels, principles of electronic mail, directory services and their use, public key infrastructure, firewall principles.
Skills: Build a secure transmission channel, work with certificates, basic routing and firewall settings.
Requirements:Programming basics and Algorithmization (in the extent of the courses ZPRO, ZALG held at the FNSPE
CTU in Prague).
Key words:Formatting and transmission of electronic mail (MIME, SMTP, IMAP, POP).
Secure communications (encryption, ssh, ssl, stunnel).
TCP / IP communications.
Directory services (LDAP, LDIF).
Public Key Infrastructure, an electronic signature.
Firewall.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Scott Oaks, Java security, O'Reilly, 2001

Recommended references:
[3] William R. Cheswick, Steven M. Bellovin, Aviel D. Rubin, "Firewalls and Internet security: repelling the wily hacker?, ADDISON-WESLEY, 2003
[4] Gert De Laet, Gert Schauwers, "Network security fundamentals?, Cisco Press, 2004
[5] William Stallings, "Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and Practice?, Prentice Hall, 2006
Internet:
[6] http://www.protocols.com/
[7] standardy "RequestForComments? (http://www.ietf.org/)

Media and tools:
Computer training room with Windows/Linux and programming languages Java, C, C++, Pascal.

System Reliability and Clinical Experiments01SKE Kůs - - 2+0 kz - 3
Course:System Reliability and Clinical Experiments01SKEIng. Kůs Václav Ph.D.2+0 KZ-3-
Abstract:The main goal of the subject is to provide the mathematical principles of reliability theory and techniques of survival data analysis, reliability of component systems, asymptotic methods for reliability, concept of experiments under censoring. The techniques are illustrated and tested within practical examples originating from lifetime material experiments and clinical trials.
Outline:1. Reliability function, mean time before failure, Mills ratio, systems with monotone hazard rate and their characteristics. 2. Exponential distribution, Poisson process, Weibull disttribution and its flexibility, asymptotics for minimum time before failure, serial-parallel systems, Gumbel distribution. 3. Generalized Gamma and Erlang distribution, Rayleigh distribution. 4. Component systems reliability analysis, serial and parallel systems, pivotal decomposition. 5. Lifetime data - censoring (type I, type II, random, mixed), maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimates of the systems under censoring. 6. Nonparametric approach, Kaplan-Meier estimate of reliability, Nelson?s estimate of cumulative hazard rate. 7. Applications to the data from clinical research, case studies in biometry, particular data processing.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: Extension of the statistical procedures for objets reliability analysis with random effects and their applications in stochastic survival tasks.
Abilities: Orientation in various stochastic time-dependent systems and their properties.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAA3-4 or 01MAB3-4, 01PRA1 nebo 01PRST held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Reliability function, hazard rate, Weibull distribution, component systems, asymptotic methods, censoring, applications, clinical trials.
References[1] Kovalenko I.N., Kuznetsov N.Y., Pegg P.A., Mathematical theory of reliability of time dependent systems with practical applications, Wiley, 1997.
[2] Kleinbaum D.G., Survival Analysis, Springer, 1996.
[3] Lange N, et al., Case studies in Biometry, Wiley, 1994.

Statistical Methods with Applications01SM Hobza - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Statistical Methods with Applications01SMIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The course consists of selected methods of statistical data analysis such as: linear regression and correlation, analysis of variance, nonparametric methods, contingency tables, simulation of random variables and their application. The aim is to illustrate the use of statistical procedures on examples. Solutions of concrete examples by use of statistical software are also included.
Outline:1. Hypothesis testing and godnes-of-fit tests
2. Linear regression and correlation
3. One-way and two-way analysis of variance
4. Nonparametric tests - sign and rank tests, Wilcoxon test, Kruskal-Wallis test
5. Contingency tables - tests of independence and homogeneity
6. Simulation of random variables
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic statistical procedures for data analysis, nonparametric methods.

Skills:
Application of theoretically studied statistical procedures to practical problems of data analysis including use of these methods on computer in the MATLAB environment.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAB3, 01MAB4 and 01PRST held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests, linear regression, ANOVA, nonparametric tests, contingency tables.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Shao, Jun: Mathematical Statistics, Springer, New York 1999

Recommended references:
[2] J.P. Marques de Sá: Applied statistics using SPSS, STATISTICA, MATLAB and R, Springer, 2007

Seminar on Calculus B101SMB12 Krbálek 0+2 z 0+2 z 2 2
Course:Seminar on Calculus B101SMB1doc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:The course is devoted to support the lectures of Calculus B3.
Outline:Physical applications of theory of differential equation, general properties of metric, norm and pre-hilbert spaces, Hilbert spaces of functions.
Outline (exercises):Physical applications of theory of differential equation, general properties of metric, norm and pre-hilbert spaces, Hilbert spaces of functions.
Goals:Knowledge: Application of mathematical theory to the practical tasks. Skills: Individual analysis of practical exercises.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus a Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2, 01LA1, 01LAB2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Solution of differential equations, metric spaces, normed and Hilbert?s spaces.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Robert A. Adams, Calculus: A complete course, 1999,
[2] Thomas Finney, Calculus and Analytic geometry, Addison Wesley, 1996

Recommended references:
[3] John Lane Bell: A Primer of Infinitesimal Analysis, Cambridge University Press, 1998

Media and tools: MATLAB

Course:Seminar on Calculus B201SMB2doc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:The course is devoted to support the lectures of Calculus B4.
Outline:Regular mappings in two- or three-dimensional space, analytical forms of tangent hyperplanes to quadrics and pseudo-quadrics, volumes of chosen bodies, derivative of integral with parameter, application of measure theory and theory of Lebesgue integral.
Outline (exercises):Regular mappings in two- or three-dimensional space, analytical forms of tangent hyperplanes to quadrics and pseudo-quadrics, volumes of chosen bodies, derivative of integral with parameter, application of measure theory and theory of Lebesgue integral.
Goals:Knowledge: Application of mathematical theory to the practical tasks. Skills: Individual analysis of practical exercises.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus a Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2, 01MAB3, 01LA1, 01LAB2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Function of several variables, measure theory, theory of Lebesgue integral
ReferencesKey references:
[1] M. Giaquinta, G. Modica, Mathematical analysis - an introduction to functions of several variables, Birkhauser, Boston, 2009

Recommended references:
[2] S.L. Salas, E. Hille, G.J. Etger, Calculus (one and more variables), Wiley, 9th edition, 2002

Media and tools: MATLAB

Mainframe Maintenance01SMF Oberhuber - - 2 z - 2
Course:Mainframe Maintenance01SMFIng. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D.-2 Z-2
Abstract:The course is devoted to mainframe administration basics. After introduction to mainframe hardware the following lectures covers security, transaction systems, virtualization and non-relational databases
in the mainframe environment.
Outline:1. Mainframe hardware.
2. Security in the mainframe environment (SAF, RACF).
3. Transaction systems (CICS).
4. Virtualization (History, Basic terms, Virtualization concept, Mainframe hardware
virtualization).
5. Non-relational databases.
Outline (exercises):1. Transaction systems
2. Non-relational databases
Goals:Knowledge: Basic overview of the mainframe
administration technics and technology.
Skills: Orientation in the area
of mainframe system administration.
Requirements:Basics of operating systems, mainframe and databases.
Key words:Mainframe, system administration, system security, transaction systems, virtualization, non-relational databases.
ReferencesKey references:
IBM, Introduction to the New Mainframe: z/OS Basics, IBM, 2005.

Recommended references:
IBM, Introduction to the New Mainframe: Security, IBM, 2006.
IBM, Introduction to the New Mainframe: z/VM Basics, IBM, 2003.

Media and tools:
Computer training room with Windows/Linux.

Software Seminar 101SOS12 Čulík 0+2 z 0+2 z 2 2
Course:Software Seminar 101SOS1Ing. Čulík Zdeněk0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:Java, Java Beans,
Assembly language programming for microprocessors Intel 80x86
Outline:1. Introduction to Java programming language
2. Java Beans components
3. Assembly language programming for microprocessors Intel 80x86
4. Registers, memory addressing
5. Instruction set, instruction codes
6. Procedure call, numeric coprocessor, MMX instructions
7. Virtual memory (80386)
8. CISC and RISC processor architectures, 64-bit microprocessors
Outline (exercises):1. Simple application written in Java programming language
2. Java data types, comparison with other programming languages
3, Introduction to graphical user interface design using Swing library
4. Classes and methods
5. Arrays in Java, differences between implementations of arrays in Java, C and Pascal
5. Interfaces, data model for JList component
7. Trees and JTree graphical component
8. Dynamic type identification - reflection and introspection
9. File input and output
10. Registers and simple Intel 80x86 instructions
11. Debugging on machine instruction level
12. Subroutines and parameter passing conventions
13. Translation of some specific high level programming language construction to machine code
Goals:Knowledge:
Introduction to Java programming language.
Differences between Java and C++. Overview of Intel 80x86 microprocessor architecture.

Skills:
Development of simple Java Application.
Requirements:
Key words:Java, assembly language.
References[1] B.Eckel, Thinking in Java (4th Edition), Prentice Hall, 2006
[2] http://mindview.net/Books
[3] http://developer.intel.com

Course:Software Seminar 201SOS2Ing. Čulík Zdeněk-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:Graphical libraries GTK+ and Qt. Development of graphical user interface using C and C++ programming languages. Portable applications for Unix like operating systems, especially for Linux systems. Portability to Microsoft Windows.
Outline:1. Introduction to graphical user interface programming in Linux (GTK+ and Qt library)
2. Development of simple application for GTK library. Object oriented framework Qt
3. Basic user interface controls
4. Response to user events
5. Compilation of applications under Linus operating system.
Outline (exercises):1. Source code for simple GTK application
2. Compilation and linking
3. Programming callback routines as a response on user events
4. Designing user interface using Glage
5. Minimal application for Qt graphics library
6. Qt signals and slots
7. Using Qt Designer and Creator
8. Widgets for lists, tables and trees
9. KDE desktop environment and KDevelop application
Goals:Knowledge:
Structure of GTK and Qt graphical user interface libraries used in Unix based operating systems.

Skills:
Write a C or C++ application with graphical user interface for Linux operating system.
Requirements:
Key words:Qt, GTK, Linux.
References[1] J. Blanchette, M. Summerfield, C++ GUI Programming with Qt 4, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2008
[2] H. Pennington, GTK+ /Gnome Application Development, Sams, 1999
[3] M. Summerfield, Rapid GUI Programming with Python and Qt, Prentice Hall, 2007
[4] http://qt.nokia.com
[5] http://library.gnome.org/devel
[6] http://www.gtk.org

Seminar of Contemporary Mathematics 101SSM12 Klika, Pelantová 0+2 z 0+2 z 2 2
Course:Seminar of Contemporary Mathematics 101SSM1Ing. Klika Václav Ph.D. / prof.Ing. Pelantová Edita CSc. / Ing. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.0+2 Z-2-
Abstract:This seminar provides a different approach to those fields of mathematics that are included in curriculum but also to those that are not part of basic courses of mathematics.
Outline:1. Definition of Eudox' real numbers, 2. Kurzweil integral, 3. Non-standard analysis, 4. Probabilistic methods in combinatorics, 5. Distributional properties of sequences, 6. Groebner basis, 7. Solving differential equations using symmetry methods, 8. On simplicial partitions. This seminar is partially covered by hosting collaborators of Dept of Mathematics.
Outline (exercises):The subject is a seminar.

This seminar provides a different approach to those fields of mathematics that are included in curriculum but also to those that are not part of basic courses of mathematics.
Goals:Knowledge:
Overview in modern trends in mathematics.

Skills: During working on simple problems and recherche on selected topic, students get acquianted with basis of scientific work.
Requirements:Knowledge of mathematical analysis, linear and general algebra in the scope of bachelor's degree programme Mathematical Modelling at FNSPE, CTU in Prague.
Key words:Modern trends in mathematics.
ReferencesPresentations of lecturers which are published on web pages of the subject and other study materials are recommended on individual basis according to the selected to pick for home work.

Obligatory:
[1] P.J. Davis, R. Hersh, The mathematical experience, Birkhauser Boston, 1981

Recommended:
[2] M. Aigner, G. M. Ziegler, Proofs from THE BOOK, Springer-Verlag, 2004

Course:Seminar of Contemporary Mathematics 201SSM2Ing. Klika Václav Ph.D. / prof.Ing. Pelantová Edita CSc.-0+2 Z-2
Abstract:This seminar provides a different approach to those fields of mathematics that are included in curriculum but also to those that are not part of basic courses of mathematics.
Outline:1. Symbolic dynamics.
2. Non-standard numeration systems.
3. Paralel algorithms.
4. Symetries of differential equations and applications
5. Integration factors, first integrals of differential equations.
This seminar is partially covered by hosting collaborators of Dept of Mathematics.
Outline (exercises):The subject is a seminar.

This seminar provides a different approach to those fields of mathematics that are included in curriculum but also to those that are not part of basic courses of mathematics.
Goals:Knowledge:
Overview in modern trends in mathematics.

Skills:
During working on simple problems and recherche on selected topic, students get acquianted with basis of scientific work.
Requirements:Knowledge of mathematical analysis, linear and general algebra in the scope of bachelor's degree programme Mathematical Modelling at FNSPE, CTU in Prague.
Key words:Modern trends in mathematics.
ReferencesPresentations of lecturers which are published on web pages of the subject and other study materials are recommended on individual basis according to the selected topic for home work.

Obligatory:
[1] P.J. Davis, R. Hersh, The mathematical experience, Birkhauser Boston, 1981

Recommended:
[2] M. Aigner, G. M. Ziegler, Proofs from THE BOOK, Springer-Verlag, 2004

Social Systems and Their Simulations01SSS Hrabák, Krbálek 2+1 zk - - 4 -
Course:Social Systems and Their Simulations01SSSdoc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.2+1 ZK-4-
Abstract:The course is devoted to the issue of social systems modeling. That includes stochastic methods and methods of statistical physics for description and analytical solution of social interaction systems, implementation of particular models and comparison of the computer simulations results with the empirical data.
Outline:1. Interdisciplinary aspects of quantitative sociodynamics, basic terminology,
2. Model classification, basic tools for simulation,
3. Cellular automata and interacting particle systems,
4. TASEP, Nagel-Schreckenberg model, Floor-field model,
5. Multi-lane komunications and cellular traffic models,
6. ODE based models,
7. Car-following models,
8. Social-force model of room evacuation,
9. Parametre calibration and validation,
10. Fundamental diagrams
11. Experimental studies,
12. Stationary state characteristics of models.
Outline (exercises):1. Computer simulation of particular models of social system,
2. The steady-state solution of chosen models,
3. Gaining and processing empirical data.
Goals:Knowledge:
Mathematical description of systems with social interaction,
Overview of models used for social system simulation,
Application of stochastic methods to their description.

Abilities:
Implementation of the models in computer simulations,
Processing and comparison of simulation results with empirical data.
Requirements:Basic course in Probability and mathematical statistics, statiscal physics, analysis of chaotic systems and programing in MATLAB (in the extent of the courses 01PRST, 01SM, 02TSFA, 01CHAOS, 18MTL held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Quantitative sociodynamics, stochastic methods for social-interaction processes, master equation, interacting particle systems, car-following models, fundamental diagram
ReferencesKey references:
[1] D. Helbing, Quantitative Sociodynamics: Stochastic Methods and Models of Social Interaction Processes, Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, 1995.
[2] A. Schadschneider, D. Chowdhury, K. Nishinari: Stochastic transport in conplex systems, Elsevier BV., Oxford, 2011.
[3] W. Weidlich, Sociodynamics - a systematic approach to mathematical modelling in the social sciences, CRC Press, 2000..

Stochastic Systems01STOS Janžura 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Stochastic Systems01STOSdoc. RNDr. Janžura Martin CSc.2+0 ZK-2-
Abstract:The course is devoted to the theory of Markov processes as mathematical models for stochastic systems, i.e. dynamic systems influenced by randomness. The main goal consists in investigating the time limit behavior for different instances according the type of the system states. The models with discrete and continuous time are distinguished, an application for practical tasks is demonstrated, in particular for queuing systems.
Outline:1 Stochastic dynamical systems, Markov processes, equilibrium, homogeneity, stationarity.
2 Markov chains, transition probability, recurrent and transient states.
3 Stationary distribution.
4 Hitting probabilities.
5 Examples: random walk, discrete time queuing model.
6 Simulation method Markov Chain Monte Carlo, probabilistic optimization algorithms, applications in statistical physics and image processing.
7 Markov processes with continuous time, transition rates.
8 Kolmogorov equations.
9 Poisson process, birth-and-death processes.
10 Queuing theory.
11 Queuing networks. Open and closed Jackson networks, computer and communication networks.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:The understanding of limit behavior of stochastic systems in the connection with the state classification. Skills: The construction of the transition probabilities matrix (transition rates) based on given information. Application of given methods in particular examples in physics and engineering.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Probability Theory (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01LA1, 01LAP, 01PRST held at the FNSPE
CTU in Prague).
Key words:Markov processes, transition probabilities, stationary distribution, hitting probabilities, transition rates, Poisson process, queuing theory.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Norris, J. R.. Markov Chains, Cambridge Uviversity Press 1997.
[2] Stroock, Daniel W.. An Introduction to Markov Processes, Springer 2005.

Recommended references:
[1] Nelson, Randolph. Probability, Stochastic Processes, and Queueing Theory, Springer 2005.
[2] Ching, Wai-Ki. Markov chains : models, algorithms and applications, Springer 2006.

Statistical Decision Theory01STR Kůs - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Statistical Decision Theory01STRIng. Kůs Václav Ph.D.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:The subject is devoted to the statistical techniques for general decision procedures based on optimization of suitable stochastic criterion, their mutual comparisons with respect to their properties and applicability.
Outline:General principles of classical statistics, loss and risk functions, decision functions, optimal strategies, Bayes and minimax solutions, admissibility principle and its consequences within classical statistics. Convex loss functions, properties of Bayes estimates, unbiasedness, sufficiency, Rao-Blackwell theorem, UMVUE estimators. Minimum distance estimates. Computational aspects for Bayesian methods, numerical procedures, approximative calculations, examples from the survival data analysis under random censoring experimental scheme.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: Extension of the decision makinng principles with random effects and their application in optimization tasks.
Abilities: Orientation in various stochastical approaches and their properties.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAA3-4 or 01MAB3-4, 01PRA1 nebo 01PRST held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Loss functions, optimal strategies, Bayesian risk, minimax solution, admissibility, aproximative calculation.
References[1] Berger J.O., Statistical Decision Theory and Bayesian Analysis, Springer, N.Y., 1985.
[2] Fishman G.S., Monte Carlo, Springer, 1996.

01SVK Mikyška - - 5 dní z - 1
Course:01SVKdoc. Ing. Mikyška Jiří Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Software Project 101SWP12 Minárik 0+2 z 0+2 z 4 4
Course:Software Project 101SWP1Ing. Minárik Vojtěch Ph.D.2 Z-4-
Abstract:Team work of students on a specific software project, i.e. proposal of the software
solution, specifications, analysing and resolving problems of the implementation,
debugging and optimization, project documentation, etc.
Outline:Syllabus is common for both subject parts 01SWP12:
1. Introduction of project topic
2. Introduction to environment (programming language, IDE), necessary program
libraries
3. Creation of application prototype
4. Full featured application and documentation
Outline (exercises):Exercise makes the integral part of the subject and has contents given by the sylabus.
Goals:Knowledge:
Methods used in software projects, technologies, commonly used program libraries, tools
for working in a team.

Skills:
Application of development tools in a team work on specified project, knowledge of
selected program libraries.
Requirements:Knowledge of programming languages like Java, C/C++.
Key words:Software project, team work, integrated development
environment, database, revision control (SVN repository), Trac - integrated SCM and project management, Hudson - continuous integration system.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] B. Eckel, Thinking in Java, Prentice Hall 2003

Recommended references:
[2] M. Dashorst, E. Hillenius, Wicket in Action, Manning 2008,
http://wicketinaction.com/

Media and tools:
Computer training room with
Windows/Linux and integrated development environment (IDE) for programming
languages Java, C/C++.

Course:Software Project 201SWP2Ing. Minárik Vojtěch Ph.D.-2 Z-4
Abstract:Team work of students on a specific software project, i.e. proposal of the software
solution, specifications, analysing and resolving problems of the implementation,
debugging and optimization, project documentation, etc.
Outline:1. Introduction of project topic
2. Introduction to environment (programming language, IDE), necessary program
libraries
3. Creation of application prototype
4. Full featured application and documentation
Outline (exercises):Exercise makes the integral part of the subject and has contents given by the sylabus.
Goals:Knowledge:
Methods used in software projects, technologies, commonly used program libraries, tools
for working in a team.

Skills:
Application of development tools in a team work on specified project, knowledge of
selected program libraries.
Requirements:Knowledge of programming languages like Java, C/C++.
Key words:Software project, team work, integrated development
environment, database, revision control (SVN repository), Trac - integrated SCM and project management, Hudson - continuous integration system.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] B. Eckel, Thinking in Java, Prentice Hall 2003

Recommended references:
[2] M. Dashorst, E. Hillenius, Wicket in Action, Manning 2008,
http://wicketinaction.com/

Media and tools:
Computer training room with
Windows/Linux and integrated development environment (IDE) for programming
languages Java, C/C++.

Number Theory01TC Masáková, Pelantová - - 4+0 zk - 4
Course:Number Theory01TCdoc.Ing. Masáková Zuzana Ph.D. / prof.Ing. Pelantová Edita CSc.-2+0 ZK-4
Abstract:The subject is devoted to elementary number theory and to fundamentals of transcendental and algebraic theory.
Outline:1. Distribution of primes, the Mertens theorems
2. Algebraic number fields, field isomorphisms
3. Diophantic equations, Pell's equation
4. Rational approximations, continued fractions
5. Algebraic and transcendental numbers
6. Rings of integers in algebraic number fields and divisibility
7. Applications for diophantic equations and in geometry
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: overview of fundamental tools of elementary and algebraic numer theory

Skills: application of methods for solution of concrete problems
Requirements:Knowledge of analysis and algebra (both linear and abstract) in the extent of bachelor's curriculum of mathematical modeling at FNSPE.
Key words:Algebraic number, number field, transcendent number, continued fraction, diphantine equation, distribution of primes
ReferencesObligatory:
[1] Z. Masáková, E. Pelantová, Teorie čísel, Skriptum ČVUT 2010.
Optional:
[2] E. B. Burger, R. Tubbs, Making transcendence transparent, Springer-Verlag 2004.
[3] M. Křížek, F. Luca, L. Somer, 17 Lectures on Fermat Numbers, Springer-Verlag 2001.

Matrix Theory01TEMA Pelantová - - 2+0 z - 3
Course:Matrix Theory01TEMAprof.Ing. Pelantová Edita CSc.-2+0 Z-3
Abstract:The subject deals mainly with the concept of similarity of matrices over the complex field, with the spectrum of non-negative matrices and with properties of tensor product.

Outline:1. The Jordan Theorem and transformation of matrix into its canonical form, invariant subspaces.
2. Relation between matrices and graphs, non-negative matrices and the Perron-Frobenius theorem, stochastic matrices.
3. Tensor product of matrices and its properties.
4. Matrices over finite fields.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Acquired knowledge: fundamental results in theory of canonical form of matrices and the Perron-Frobenius theory for nonnegative matrices.
Acquired skills: applications of these results in the graph theory and in the algebraic number theory.
Requirements:Successful completion of courses Linear algbera and General algebra.
Key words:The canonical form of matrix, similarity of matrices, dominant eigenvalue, tensor product
ReferencesObligatory:
[1] M. Fiedler, Special Matrices and Their Applications in Numerical Mathematics. Second Edition. Dover Publications, Inc., Mineola, U.S.A., 2008.
Optional:
[2] D.K. Faddeev, V.N. Faddeeva, Computational methods of linear algebra. Translated by Robert C. Williams W. H. Freeman and Co., San Francisco-London 1963

Information Theory01TIN Hobza 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Information Theory01TINIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.2+0 ZK-2-
Abstract:Information theory explores the fundamental limits of the representation and transmission of information. We will focus on the definition and implications of (information) entropy, the source coding theorem, and the channel coding theorem. These concepts provide a vital background for researchers in the areas of data compression, signal processing, controls, and pattern recognition.
Outline:1. Information source and entropy, joint and conditional entropy, information divergence, informations and their relation to entropy
2. Jensen inequality and the methods of convex analysis, sufficient statistics and data processing theorem
3. Fano inequality and Cramér-Rao inequality, asymptotic equipartition property of memoryless sources
4. Entropy rates of information sources, stationary and Markov sources
5. Data compression, Kraft inequality for instantaneous and uniquely decodable codes, Huffman codes
6. Capacity of noisy channels, Shannon theorem about transmissibility of a source through a channel
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Basic notions and principles of information theory.

Skills:
Ability of application of acquired knowledge to solution of practical problems such as finding optimal Huffman codes, calculation of stacionary distribution of Markov chains, calculation of information channel capacity.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAA3, 01MAA4 and 01PRA1 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Entropy, information, information divergence, Fano?s inequality, Markov chains, entropy rate, data compression, Huffman code, instantaneous code, Kraft inequality, asymptotic equipartition property.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] T. Cover and J. Thomas: Elements of information theory, Wiley, 1994

Recommended references:
[2] D. J. C. Mackay: Information Theory, Inference, and Learning Algorithms, Cambridge University Press, 2003

Theory of Codes01TKO Mareš - - 2 zk - 2
Course:Theory of Codes01TKOdoc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.-2 ZK-2
Abstract:Algebraic methods used in error detecting and error correcting codes.
Outline:Error detecting and error correcting codes, minimum distance of a code, information and check symbols, coding information symbols, linear codes, generator and parity check matrices, standard decoding, Hamming codes, Golay code, cyclic codes, BCH codes, Reed-Muller codes.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To acquaint students with using results of linear and general algebra for creating error detecting and error correcting codes and their decoding methods.
Requirements:Knowledge of foundations of linear and general algebra,particularly finite fields.
Key words:Code, linear codes, cyclic codes, decoding algorithms.
ReferencesPovinná
Blahut R.E.: Theory and Practice of Error Control Codes. Addison-Wesley, Massachusetts, 1984.
Doporučená
Guiasu S.: Information Theory with Applications. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1977.

Theory of Codes B01TKOB Mareš - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Theory of Codes B01TKOBdoc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:Coding of the source of information, the shortest code, entropy. Error detecting and error correcting codes - algebraic methods.
Outline:Coding and codes, prefix codes, Kraft?s inequality, McMillan?s theorem, the shortest code, entropy as a measure of information. Error detecting and error correcting codes, minimum distance of a code, information and parity check symbols, coding information symbols, linear codes, generation and parity check matrices, standard decoding, Hamming codes, cyclic codes.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To acquaint students with using results of linear and general algebra for creating error detecting and error correcting codes and their decoding methods.
Requirements:
Key words:Coding, code, entropy, linear codes, cyclic codes, decoding algorithms.
ReferencesPovinná
Blahut R.E.: Theory and Practice of Error Control Codes. Addison-Wesley, Massachusetts, 1984.
Doporučená
Guiasu S.: Information Theory with Applications. McGraw-Hill, New York, 1977.

Random Matrix Theory01TNM Krbálek 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Random Matrix Theory01TNMdoc.Mgr. Krbálek Milan Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Topology01TOP Burdík 2+0 zk - - 2 -
Course:Topology01TOPprof.RNDr. Burdík Čestmír DrSc.2+0 ZK-2-
Abstract:The aim of lecture is the systematization and deepening the knowledge of general topology.
Outline:1.Structure on the set. 2. Real number and plane. 3.Sets, products and sums. 4. Graphs. 5. Mathematical structures. 6. Abstract spaces. 7. Structure of topological spases. 8. Separation axioms. 9. Hausdorff spaces. 10. Normal spaces. 11. Compact spaces. 12. Topology of metric. 13. Metric spaces.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge : mathematical basis for a general topology. Skills: able to think in the schema definition, theorem and proof, and the use of general topology.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA, 01MAA2-4, 01LAP, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Topological space, product topology, subspace topology, contiunous function, connected spaces, compact spaces, separation axioms.
ReferencesKey references: [1] John L. Kelly, (Springer, 1975, 315 pp., ISBN10:0-387-90125-6), [2] Bourbaki; Elements of Mathematics: General Topology, Addison-Wesley(1966).
Recommended references: [3] Willard, Stephen (2004). General Topology. Dover Publications. ISBN 0-486-43479-6. [4] Basener, William (2006). Topology and Its Applications (1st ed.).Wiley. ISBN 0-471-68755-3.

Basic of Representation Theory of Lie Algebras01TRLA Burdík - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Basic of Representation Theory of Lie Algebras01TRLAprof.RNDr. Burdík Čestmír DrSc.-2+0 ZK-2
Abstract:Lie algebra is an integral part of many theories in natural sciences. The lecture formulates the fundamentals of Lie algebras and their representations.

Outline:1. Definitions and examples of Lie algebras. 2. The relationship between Lie group and Lie algebra . 3. The definition of Lie algebra representations , adjoint representation. 4. Enveloping algebra, Casimir elements. 5. Structural theory, subalgebras and ideals of Lie algebras. 6. Direct and semi-direct product of Lie algebras. 7.Nilpotent, simple, and semi-simple Lie algebras. 8. Cartan decomposition, construction of Lie algebra from Cartan matrix. 9. Kac-Moody algebras . 10. Superalgebra. 11. Examples of using in mathematics and mathematical physics.

Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge: to acquire the mathematical basis of the representation theory of Lie algebras. Abilities: able to use the representation in applications.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in particular, the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LAP, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Lie algebra, Lie group, enveloping algebra, Cartan matrix, representations, Kac-Moody algebras and superalgebras.
ReferencesKey references: [1] Serre, Jean-Pierre (1965), Lie Algebras and Lie Groups: 1964 Lectures given at Harvard University, Lecture notes in mathematics, 1500, Springer, ISBN 3-540-55008-9 .
[2] Adams, John Frank (1969), Lectures on Lie Groups, Chicago Lectures in Mathematics, Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, ISBN 0-226-00527-5 . [2] Borel, Armand (2001), "Essays in the history of Lie groups and algebraic groups", History of Mathematics (American Mathematical Society) 21, ISBN 0-8218-0288-7 . [3] Bourbaki, Nicolas, Elements of mathematics: Lie groups and Lie algebras . Chapters 1-3 ISBN 3-540-64242-0, Chapters 4-6 ISBN 3-540-42650-7, Chapters 7-9 ISBN 3-540-43405-4. [4] Fulton, William; Harris, Joe (1991), Representation theory. A first course, Graduate Texts in Mathematics, Readings in Mathematics, 129, New York: Springer-Verlag, MR1153249, ISBN 978-0-387-97527-6, ISBN 978-0-387-97495-8. [5]Hall, Brian C. (2003), Lie Groups, Lie Algebras, and Representations: An Elementary Introduction, Springer, ISBN 0-387-40122-9 .

Complexity Theory01TSLO Majerech 3+0 zk - - 3 -
Course:Complexity Theory01TSLOMajerech Vladan3+0 ZK-3-
Abstract:The course is devoted to incorporation of complexity questions during algorithm development, introduction to NP completeness and generally to complexity classes of deterministic or nondeterministic Turing machines bounded by time or space. Emphasis is placed on mutual relations among these classes. Aside from nondeterministic classes we examine probability classes. Class of interactive protocols is presented at the end of lecture course.
Outline:1.Complexity dimensions - expected, randomized, amortized; basic data structures 2. Divide & conquer - recurrence, Strassen algorithm, sorting (+lower bound), median algorithm, prune and search 3. Fibonacci heaps, Dijkstra algorithm, minimum spanning tree - Fredman+Tarjan algorithm, Kruskal algorithm and DFU. 4. NP-completeness and basic transforms (SAT, tiling, clique) 5. Further NP complete examples (Hamiltonian paths and cycles, knapsack) Fully polynomial approximation scheme for the knapsack problem 6. Turing machines, linear compression and speedup, tape reductions, universal machines 7. Constructability, inclusions among complexity classes, hierarchy theorems 8. Padding argument, Borodin?s theorem, Blum?s theorem 9. Generalised nondeterminism and probability classes 10. Polynomial hierarchy, complete problems. 11. Interactive protocols
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Learn to incorporate complexity questions during algorithms development, learn to think about lower bounds of problem?s complexities. Learn basic relations among complexity classes.
Requirements:
Key words:complexity, NP completeness, algorithm
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J. L. Balcázar, J. Díaz, J Gabarró: "Structural Complexity I", Springer - Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York London Paris Tokyo 1988

Recommended references:
[2] Hopcroft, Ullmann "Introduction to Automata Theory and Computing", ISBN 0-201-02988-X

01TVS Mařík 2+2 z,zk - - 6 -
Introduction to Bioinformatics01UBIO Oberhuber 2 kz - - 2 -
Course:Introduction to Bioinformatics01UBIOIng. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D.2 KZ-2-
Abstract:Bionformatics belongs to one of fastest progressing area of the human research. In more general understanding, any nontrivial application of methods from the computer science to biology can be seen as bioinformatics. This course is aimed mainly to analysis of DNA sequences and proteins. However, the algorithms being taught in this course find applications in many other areas.
Outline:1. Introduction to molecular biology
2. DNA mapping
3. Motif finding
4. Genome rearrangement (reversal sort)
5-7. Sequence alignment (dynamic programing)
8. Gene prediction
9. DNA sequencing
10. Protein identification
11. Combinatorial pattern matching (suffix trees)
12. Clustering, Hidden Markov Models
Outline (exercises):1. Reversal sort
2. Dynamic programming
3. Suffix trees
4. Clustering
Goals:Knowledge:
DNA mapping, DNA sequencing, comparing sequences, genes prediction, proteins identification, motif finding, phylogenetic trees reconstruction, dynamic programming, clustering, suffix trees.

Skills:
Student will be able to apply the algorithms being teached to some simple problems in DNA sequence or protein analysis. These algorithms can be also used for advanced text and data set processing.
Requirements:Basics of algorithms on the level of the course Basics of algoritmization.
Key words:Molecular biology, DNA, RNA, proteins, sequencing, sequence analysis, algorithms, dynamic programming, graph algorithms, suffix trees, clustering, text processing.
ReferencesKey references:
N. C. Jones, P. A. Pevzner, An introduction to bioinformatics, MIT Press, 2004.

Recommended references:
W.-K. Sung, Algorithms in bioinformatics - a practical introduction, CRC Press, 2010.

Media and tools:

Introduction to Cryptology01UKRY Dvořáková - - 2+0 z - 2
Course:Introduction to Cryptology01UKRYIng. Dvořáková Lubomíra Ph.D.-2+0 Z-2
Abstract:An introductive survey of cryptography and cryptoanalysis starting with classical ciphers, passing through mechanical rotor machines, symmetric and asymmetric cryptography to quantum cryptography.
Outline:1. Classical ciphers (substitution, transposition, Vigenere cipher, Playfair cipher).
2. Mechanical rotor machines (Enigma, Lorenz).
3. Random number generators.
4. Symmetric cryptography (block ciphers, DES, triple DES, AES).
5. Primality testing (Lucas-Lehmer, Rabin-Miller).
6. Asymmetric cryptography (RSA, El Gamal, D-H key exchange, Goldwasser-Micali, Rabin).
7. Digital signature.
8. Hash functions.
9. E-mail and internet secrecy.
10. Quantum cryptography.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
History of cryptology and actual enciphering techniques and the theory behind them (generation of random numbers, primality testing, hash functions).

Abilities:
Computer implementation of studied algorithms.
Requirements:Having the subject Discrete Mathematics done is recommended.
Key words:Classical ciphers, mechanical rotor machines, random number generators, symmetric cryptography, primality testing, asymmetric cryptography, digital signature, hash functions, e-mail and internet secrecy, quantum cryptography
ReferencesKey references:
[1] R. A. Mollin, An Introduction to Cryptography, 2nd edition, Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2007
[2]. J. Katz, Y. Lindell, Introduction to Modern Cryptography, Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2008

Recommended references:
[3] B. Schneier, Applied Cryptography, John Wiley and Sons, 1996
[4] D. Welsh, Codes and Cryptography, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1989

Introduction to Mainframe01UMF Oberhuber 2 z - - 2 -
Course:Introduction to Mainframe01UMFIng. Oberhuber Tomáš Ph.D.2 Z-2-
Abstract:In this course we teach the mainframe architecture. We explain how to operate the system z/OS, how to start a job using the JCL and we explain some differences when programming in C/C++ for z/OS:
Outline:1. Introduction to the mainframe
2. Memory management in z/OS
3. Data sets in z/OS
4. ISPF - user interface
5. JES - system for job processing
6.-10. JCL - scripting language
11. Programming v C/C++
12. Rexx
Outline (exercises):1. ISPF - user interface
2. JCL - scripting language
3. Programming in C/C++
4. Programming in REXX
Goals:Knowledge:
Understanding the differences between common servers and mainframes, hardware of zSeries, z/OS operating system, data sets, working with ISPF, writing of JCL scripts, programming in C/C++.

Skills:
Student is able to work with ISPF, he can cerate and manage data sets, write JCL scripts and compile and link programs written in C/C++. The student understands what requirements are posed on highly reliable systems.
Requirements:Basics of operating systems, basic knowledge of Unix/Windows, programming in C/C++.
Key words:Mainframe, z/OS, z/Serie, JCL, ISPF, C/C++. Rexx.
ReferencesKey references:
IBM, Introduction to the new mainframe, IBM, 2005.
Recommended references:
IBM, ABCs of z/OS System Programming Volume 1-3, IBM, 2004.
Media and tools:
Computer lab, account on the mainframe system.

Probabilistic Models of Artificial Intelligence01UMIN Vejnarová 2+0 kz - - 2 -
Course:Probabilistic Models of Artificial Intelligence01UMINIng. Vejnarová Jiřina2+0 KZ-2-
Abstract:The course is devoted to the survey of methods used for uncertainty processing in the field of artificial inteligence. The main attention is paid to so-called graphical Markov models, particularly to Bayesian networks.
Outline:1. Introduction to artificial intelligence: problem solving, state spaces, search for solution, algorithm A star, optimality of solution. 2. Uncertainty in artificial intelligence: uncertainty in expert systems, pseudobayesian uncertainty processing in Prospector. 3. Imprecise probabilities: capacities, lower an upper probabilities, coherence, belief functions, possibility measures, credal sets. 4. Conditional independence and its properties: factorization lemma, block independence lemma. 5.Graphical Markov properties: pairwise, local and global Markov properties. 6. Triangulated graphs: graph decomposition, maximum cardinality search, perfect ordering of nodes and cliques, triangularization of graphs, running intersection property, junction trees. 7. Bayesian networks: consistency of distribution represented by a Bayesian network, dependence structure. 8. Computation in Bayesain networks: Shachter algorithm, transformation of Bayesian networks to decomposable models, message passing in junction trees.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Uncertainty models in artificial inteligence and methods of its processing. Skills: Application of given methods to particular problems.
Requirements:Basic course of probabilitz and mathematical statistics
Key words:artificial intelligence, uncertainty, imprecise probabilities, conditional independence, graphical Markov properties, decomposable graphs, Bayesian networks.
Referenceskey references:
[1] P. Hájek, T. Havránek, R. Jiroušek, Uncertain Information Processing in Expert Systems, CRC Press 1992.

key references:
[1] P. Hájek, T. Havránek, R. Jiroušek, Uncertain Information Processing in Expert Systems, CRC Press 1992.

Introduction to Object Programming01UOP Čulík 0+2 zk - - 2 -
Course:Introduction to Object Programming01UOPIng. Čulík Zdeněk----
Abstract:Object oriented programming languages. Object oriented programming libraries for graphics, databases and distributed systems.
Outline:1. Evolution of object oriented programming languages
2. Type inheritance, encapsulation, polymorphism
3. Interfaces in C++ and Java
4. Templates and generic constructions
5. Design patterns
6. Objects and graphical user interface
7. 3D graphics, Open Inventor
8. Distributed systems: CORBA, COM, DBus
9. Object oriented databases
10. History: Simula 67, Smalltalk, Ada
11. Programming language Python
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Evolution of object oriented programming languages. Objects and modern software technologies.

Skills:
Design object oriented application. Develop application which uses object oriented libraries.
Requirements:
Key words:Programming languages, object oriented programming, C++, Java, Python
References[1] B. Stroustrup: The C++ Programming Language, 3rd Edition, Addison-Wesley, 1997
[2] B. Stroustrup: The Design and Evolution
[3] B.Eckel: Thinking in Java (4th Edition), Prentice Hall, 2006
[4] M.Lutz: Learning Python: Powerful Object-Oriented Programming, O'Reilly Media, 2009

Introduction to Computer Science01UTI Mareš - - 2+0 kz - 2
Course:Introduction to Computer Science01UTIdoc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.-2+0 KZ-2
Abstract:Fundamental notions of computer science: algorithms, various types of automata, introduction to information theory and coding theory.
Outline:Algorithms and algorithmically computable functions, algorithmically definable sets. Markov?s normal algorithms, Turing machines, pushdown storage automata, finite automata.
Sequential machines, analysis, synthesis and minimization. Introduction to information theory and coding theory.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To acquaint the students with fundamentals parts of computer science.
Requirements:
Key words:Algorithm, automaton, entropy, coding.
Referencespovinná
H.R. Lewis, C.H.Papadimitriou: Elements of the Theory of Computation. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1981.
doporučená
Z. Manna: Mathematical Theory of Computation. Mc.Graw-Hill,Inc. 1974.

Introduction to Theoretical Informatics01UTIZ Mareš - - 2+0 zk - 2
Course:Introduction to Theoretical Informatics01UTIZdoc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References

Variational Methods01VAM Beneš 2 zk - - 3 -
Course:Variational Methods01VAMprof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal2 ZK-3-
Abstract:The course is devoted to the methods of classical variational calculus - functional extrema by Euler equations, second functional derivative, convexity or monotonicity. Further, it contains investigation of quadratic functional, generalized solution, Sobolev spaces and variational problem for elliptic PDE's.
Outline:1. Functional extremum, Euler equations.
2. Conditions for functional extremum.
3. Theorem on the minimum of a quadratic functional.
4. Construction of minimizing sequences and their convergence.
5. Choice of basis.
6. Sobolev spaces.
7. Traces. Weak formulation of the boundary conditions.
8. V-ellipticity. Lax-Milgram theorem.
9. Weak solution of boundary-value problems.
Outline (exercises):Exercise makes part of the contents and is devoted to solution of particular examples in variational calculus - shortest path, minimal surface area, bending rod, Cahn-Hilliard phase-transition theory etc.
Goals:Knowledge:
Classical variational calculus - conditions for existence of functional extrema, Euler equations, extremum of quadratic functional, generalized solution of operator equation, Sobolev spaces and weak solution of boundary value problems for elliptic PDE.

Skills:
Analysis of functional extrema, solution of common problems of variational calculus and determination of solution properties.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Numerical Mathematics, variational methods (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-4, 01LA1, 01LAA, 01NM, 01FA12 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Variational calculus, Gâteaux derivative, Fréchet derivative, functional extrema, convexity, monotonicity, quadratic functional, Sobolev spaces, weak solution, Lax-Milgram theorem.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] S. V. Fomin, R. A. Silverman, Calculus of variations, Courier Dover Publications, Dover 2000
[2] K. Rektorys, Variational Methods In Mathematics, Science And Engineering, Springer, Berlin, 2001

Recommended references:
[3] B. Dacorogna, Introduction to the Calculus of Variations, Imperial College Press, London 2004
[4] B. Van Brunt, The calculus of variations, Birkhäuser, Basel 2004
[5] E. Giusti, Direct methods in the calculus of variations, World Scientific, Singapore 2003

Variational Methods B01VAMB Beneš 2 kz - - 2 -
Course:Variational Methods B01VAMBprof.Dr.Ing. Beneš Michal2 KZ-2-
Abstract:The course is devoted to the methods of classical variational calculus - functional extrema by Euler equations, second functional derivative, convexity or monotonicity. Further, it contains investigation of quadratic functional, generalized solution, Sobolev spaces and variational problem for elliptic PDE's.
Outline:1. Functional extremum, Euler equations.
2. Conditions for functional extremum.
3. Theorem on the minimum of a quadratic functional.
4. Construction of minimizing sequences and their convergence.
5. Choice of basis.
6. Sobolev spaces.
7. Traces. Weak formulation of the boundary conditions.
8. V-ellipticity. Lax-Milgram theorem.
9. Weak solution of boundary-value problems.
Outline (exercises):Exercise makes part of the contents and is devoted to solution of particular examples in variational calculus - shortest path, minimal surface area, bending rod, Cahn-Hilliard phase-transition theory etc.
Goals:Knowledge:
Classical variational calculus - conditions for existence of functional extrema, Euler equations, extremum of quadratic functional, generalized solution of operator equation, Sobolev spaces and weak solution of boundary value problems for elliptic PDE.

Skills:
Analysis of functional extrema, solution of common problems of variational calculus and determination of solution properties.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus, Linear Algebra and Numerical Mathematics, variational methods (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAB2-4, 01LA1, 01LAB2, 12NMET held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Variational calculus, Gâteaux derivative, Fréchet derivative, functional extrema, convexity, monotonicity, quadratic functional, Sobolev spaces, weak solution, Lax-Milgram theorem.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] S. V. Fomin, R. A. Silverman, Calculus of variations, Courier Dover Publications, Dover 2000
[2] K. Rektorys, Variational Methods In Mathematics, Science And Engineering, Springer, Berlin, 2001

Recommended references:
[3] B. Dacorogna, Introduction to the Calculus of Variations, Imperial College Press, London 2004
[4] B. Van Brunt, The calculus of variations, Birkhäuser, Basel 2004
[5] E. Giusti, Direct methods in the calculus of variations, World Scientific, Singapore 2003

Selected Topics in Functional Analysis01VPFA Havlíček, Tušek - - 2+1 z,zk - 3
Course:Selected Topics in Functional Analysis01VPFAIng. Tušek Matěj Ph.D.----
Abstract:Selected topics in functional analysis, functional analysis methods used in probability, statistics and stochastic processes.
Outline:1. Basic notions in topology and measure theory
2. Basic inequalities, convex functions
3. Banach spaces, spaces of bounded linear operators
4. Hilbert spaces, projectors, Radon-Nikodym theorem
5. Hahn-Banach theorem
6. Weak topology and convergence
7. Fourier transform and applications
8. Semigroups of operators
9. Applications in stochastic processes
Outline (exercises):1. Elements of topology, measure theory, convex functions and basic inequalities
2. Properties of Banach and Hilbert spaces
3. Bounded linear operators
4. Fourierova transform
5. Complete orthonormal systems in Hilbert spaces
6. Weak convergence
7. Semigroups, Markov processes
Goals:Basic skills for applications in probability, statistics and stochastic processes.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Linear Algebra (in the extent of the courses 01MA, 01MAA2-4, 01LAP, 01LAA2 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Banach spaces, Hilbert spaces, Linear operators, Fourier transform, semigroups of operators
ReferencesKey references:
[1] Blank, Exner, Havlíček: Hilbert Space Operators in Quantum Physics, Springer, 2008.

Recommended references:
[2] M. Reed, B. Simon: Methods of Modern Mathematical Physics I.-IV., Academic Press, N. Zealand, 1972-1979
[3] Bobrowski: Functional Analysis for Probability and Stochastic Processes, An Introduction, New York, 2005

Research Project 101VUAM12 Hobza 0+6 z 0+8 kz 6 8
Course:Research Project 101VUAM1Ing. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.0+6 Z-6-
Abstract:Research project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the research project under preparation.
Outline:Research yearlong project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Student participation in research.
Knowledge: particular research theme depending on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:Bachelor thesis BP12, individual.
The ability of independent students research work and skills.
Key words:Research project, research, development, mathematical and computer science models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual - according to the given references.

Course:Research Project 201VUAM2Ing. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.-0+8 KZ-8
Abstract:Research project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the research project under preparation.
Outline:Research yearlong project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Student participation in research.
Knowledge: particular research theme depending on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:Bachelor thesis BP12, individual.
The ability of independent students research work and skills.
Key words:Research project, research, development, mathematical and computer science models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual - according to the given references.

Research Project 101VUMM12 Hobza 0+6 z 0+8 kz 6 8
Course:Research Project 101VUMM1Ing. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.0+6 Z-6-
Abstract:Research project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the research project under preparation.
Outline:Research yearlong project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Student participation in research.
Knowledge: particular research theme depending on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:Bachelor thesis BP12, individual.
The ability of independent students research work and skills.
Key words:Research project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual - according to the given references.

Course:Research Project 201VUMM2Ing. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.-0+8 KZ-8
Abstract:Research project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the research project under preparation.
Outline:Research yearlong project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Student participation in research.
Knowledge: particular research theme depending on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:Bachelor thesis BP12, individual.
The ability of independent students research work and skills.
Key words:Research project, research, development, mathematical models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual - according to the given references.

Research Project 101VUSI12 Hobza 0+6 z 0+8 kz 6 8
Course:Research Project 101VUSI1Ing. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.0+6 Z-6-
Abstract:Research project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the research project under preparation.
Outline:Research yearlong project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Student participation in research.
Knowledge: particular research theme depending on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:Bachelor thesis BP12, individual.
The ability of independent students research work and skills.
Key words:Research project, research, development, mathematical and computer science models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual - according to the given references.

Course:Research Project 201VUSI2Ing. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.-0+6 KZ-8
Abstract:Research project on the selected topic under the supervision. Supervision and regular checking of the research project under preparation.
Outline:Research yearlong project on the selected topic under the supervision.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Student participation in research.
Knowledge: particular research theme depending on a given project topic.
Abilities: working unaided on a given task, understanding the problem, producing the original specialist text.
Requirements:Bachelor thesis BP12, individual.
The ability of independent students research work and skills.
Key words:Research project, research, development, mathematical and computer science models, applications.
ReferencesIndividual - according to the given references.

Selected Topics in Mathematics01VYMA Mikyška - - 2+2 z,zk - 4
Course:Selected Topics in Mathematics01VYMAdoc. Ing. Mikyška Jiří Ph.D.-2+2 Z,ZK-4
Abstract:Fourier series: complete orthogonal systems, expansion of functions into Fourier series, trigonometric Fourier series and their convergence. Complex analysis: derivative of holomorphic functions, integral, Cauchy's theorem, Cauchy's integral formula, singularities, Laurent series, residue theorem.
Outline:1. Theory of Fourier series in a general Hilbert space, complete orthogonal systems, Bessel inequality, Parseval equality.
2. Fourier series in L2, trigonometric system, Fourier coefficients, Bessel inequality, Parseval equality, expansion of a function into trigonometric series.
3. Criteria of convergence of Fourier series.
4. Analysis of complex functions: derivative, analytical functions, Cauchy-Riemann conditions.
5. Contour integral of complex functions of a complex variable, theorem of Cauchy, Cauchy's integral formula.
6. Expansion of an analytic function into a power series, isolated singularities, Laurent expansion, residue theorem.
Outline (exercises):1. Summary of properties of function series, investigation of the uniform convergence of function series.
2. Fourier series in a general Hilbert space, Gramm-Schmidt ortogonalization, ortogonal polynomials.
3. Trigonometric system in L2. Expansions of trigonometric functions into trigonometric Fourier series, investigation of convergence of the trigonometric series. Summation of some series using the Fourier expansions.
4. Elementary functions of complex variables: polynomials, exponential function, goniometric functions, complex logarithm
5. Analysis in a complex domain: continuity, derivative, Cauchy-Riemann conditions.
6. Evaluation of contour integrals of complex functions of a complex variable, applications of the Cauchy theorem, Cauchy integral formula and residue theorem.
Goals:Expansion of functions to the Fourier series and investigation of their convergence, application of theory of analytic functions for evaluation of curve integrals in complex plane and evaluation of some types of definite integral of real functions of a real variable.

Skills: to use expansions of functions into a Fourier series to evaluate sums of some series, evaluation of definite integrals using the theory of functions of complex variable.
Requirements:Basic Calculus (in the extent of the courses 01MA1, 01MAA2-3, or 01MAB2-3 held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Sequences and series of functions,
Fourier series, complex analysis.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] J. Dunning-Davies, Mathematical Methods for Mathematicians, Physical Scientists and Engineers, John Wiley and Sons Inc., 1982.

Recommended references:
[2] A. S. Cakmak, J. F. Botha, and W. G. Gray, Computational and Applied Mathematics for Engineering Analysis, Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg, 1987.

Computability and Mathematical Logic01VYML Mareš 4+0 zk - - 4 -
Course:Computability and Mathematical Logic01VYMLdoc.RNDr. Mareš Jan CSc.4+0 ZK-4-
Abstract:Algorithms and algorithmically computable functions, algorithmically definable sets and their mathematical definitions. Recursion theory. Classical propositional and predicate logic. Application of the recursion theory to the logic.
Outline:Algorithms and algorithmically computable functions, Markov?s normal algorithms, Turing machines, recursive functions, recursive and recursively enumerable sets and predicates, s-m-n theorem, productive and creative sets, algorithmically unsolvable problems. Propositions, tautologies, axioms, theorems, correctness, completeness and decidability of propositional calculus. Relational structures, language of predicate calculus, terms, formulae, axioms, theorems, satisfactions, truth, tautologies, correctness, model, Gödel completeness theorem, undecidability of predicate calculus, resolution method.
Outline (exercises):
Goals:To acquaint the students with classical results of the recursion theory as a mathematical definition of intuitive notion of the algorithm and with used finite and constructive methods. Principal results of the classical logic.
Requirements:
Key words:Algorithm, Turing machine, recursive functions, sets, and predicates. Propositional and predicate calculus.
ReferencesPovinná
N. Cutland: Computability. An Introduction to Recursive Functions Theory. Cambridge
University Press, Cambridge, 1980. (Selected chapters.)
A. Grzegorczyk: An Outline of Mathematical Logic. Polish Scientific Publishers,
Varšava 1974. (Selected chapters.)
Doporučená
Z. Manna: Mathematical Theory of Computation. Mc.Graw-Hill,Inc. 1974.
H.R. Lewis, C.H.Papadimitriou: Elements of the Theory of Computation. Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1981.

Generalized Linear Models and Application01ZLIM Hobza, Víšek - - 2+1 zk - 3
Course:Generalized Linear Models and Application01ZLIMIng. Hobza Tomáš Ph.D.2+1 ZK-3-
Abstract:In this course we will consider a series of statistical models which generalize classical linear models with normally distributed objective variables. This course consists of the theory of generalized linear models (GLM), outline of the algorithms used for GLM estimation, and explanation how to determine which algorithm to use for a given data analysis.
Outline:1. Generalized linear models: exponential family, regularity conditions, score function
2. Estimation of parameters: maximum likelihood estimates, numerical methods used for their calculation, Newton-Raphson, Fisher-scoring
3. Testing of models: asymptotical distribution of the score function and the MLE estimates, models comparisons, residual analysis
4. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), elements of matrix algebra, general model of analysis of covariance, one factor ANCOVA
5. Models for binary data: uniform model, logistic model, normal model, Gumbel model
6. Poisson regression: Poisson distribution, univariate and multivariate Poisson regression, tests and residua, Poisson model for small area estimation
7. Multivariate logistic regression: multivariate logit model, tests about estimated parameters, residua, logit area model
Outline (exercises):1. Estimation of parameters, maximum likelihood estimates, numerical methods used for their calculation, Newton-Raphson, Fisher-scoring
2. Testing of models, models comparisons, residual analysis
3. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA)
4. Logistic regression
5. Poisson regression
6. Multivariate logistic regression.
Goals:Knowledge:
Generalized linear statistical models and methods for estimation of their parameters.

Skills:
Application of theoretically studied statistical procedures to practical problems of data analysis including demonstration of use of these methods on computer in the MATLAB or R environment.
Requirements:Basic course of Calculus and Probability (in the extent of the courses 01MAB3, 01MAB4 and 01PRST held at the FNSPE CTU in Prague).
Key words:Generalized linear model, score function, analysis of covariance, logistic regression, Poisson regression, residua.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] A.J. Dobson: An Introduction to Generalized Linear Models. London: Chapman and Hall, 1990

Recommended references:
[2] J.K. Lindsey: Applying Generalized Linear Models. Springer Verlag, 1998

Introduction to Operating Systems01ZOS Čulík - - 2+0 z - 2
Course:Introduction to Operating Systems01ZOSIng. Čulík Zdeněk-2+0 Z-2
Abstract:Introduction to structure of operating systems. Processes, thread, memory management. Synchronization of multi=threaded applications. Memory mapped files.
Outline:1. Introduction to operating systems (kernel structure, security)
2. Processes and threads (creation and termination of processes and threads, thread scheduling and priority).
3. Thread synchronization (critical sections, semaphores)
4. Memory management (virtual memory, memory mapped files)
5. Introduction to distributed systems (RPC - remote procedure call, CORBA and COM architecture)
6. TCP/IP network communication (packet routing, DNS service)
Outline (exercises):
Goals:Knowledge:
Structure of operating system, low level file handle manipulation, process and thread creation.

Skills:
Develop multi-threaded application.
Requirements:
Key words:processes, threads, memory managment
References[1] A. S. Tanenbaum: Operating Systems: Design And Implementation, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1987
[2] W. Stallings, Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles, Prentice Hall, 2005
[3] J. M. Richter: Advanced Windows, Microsoft Press, Redmond, 1997
[4] A. Rubini, J. Corbet: Linux Device Drivers, O'Reilly, 2001
[5] D. Bovet, M. Cesati, A. Oram: Understanding the Linux Kernel, O'Reilly, 2001

Diagnostic Signal Processing01ZSIG Převorovský - - 3+0 zk - 3
Course:Diagnostic Signal Processing01ZSIGIng. Převorovský Zdeněk CSc.-3+0 ZK-3
Abstract:The course is devoted to modern techniques of the analog and digital signal processing used in physics, measurements and information science. Basic signal transforms and their discrete equivalents are explained to describe signals and their transfer in different representations. Practical training is based on MATLAB software with Signal and Wavelet Toolboxes.
Outline:1. Methods and signals in Nondestructive (non-invasive) Testing, Evaluation and Diagnostics (ultrasonic, acoustic, electromagnetic, optical, radiation, mechanical). 2. Digital systems and techniques in diagnostics (nuclear sciences, transport, civil engineering, medicine). 3. Measurement devices and sensors. Principles of various detectors. Mathematical fundamentals of signal sampling. Computerized data acquisition and process control Analog-Digital converters, digital filters, oscilloscopes, signal generators, amplifiers, spectrometers. 4. Signal preprocessing and recording (amplification, filtration, parameterization, envelope analysis, data transfer and storage). Methods of diagnostic data evaluation. 5. Linear and nonlinear systems. Transfer function and impulse response. Nonlinear methods, time reversal algorithms, tomography. 6. Measurement and processing of deterministic signals. Convolution and deconvolution, analysis in time-, frequency-, and time-frequency domain. Wavelet analysis and filtration. 7. Processing of stochastic signals. Analysis and rejection of noise. Signal features and statistical parameters, higher-order statistical analysis (HOSA), principal component and factor analysis, signal arrival detection, (threshold, probabilistic). 8. Selected methods of of signal recognition and diagnostic data analysis. Principles of acoustic emission source location, artificial neural networks, relevant features for signal classification. 9. Introduction to programming in MATLAB Simulink and NI LabView, and program examples.
Outline (exercises):Practical examples and computer presentations of diagnostic methods are integral parts of the course and they are performed in NDT Laboratory of the Institute of Thermomechanics AS CR.
Goals:Basic knowledge on methodology of data mining in nondestructive testing and evaluation of materials and structures. Structural health monitoring and analogical medical diagnostics. Physical principles of diagnostic systems and fundamentals of digital measurement and signal processing. Skills: Design and use of digital measurement and data evaluation equipments. Mathematical methods of data conversion, denoising, and modification for object diagnostics and monitoring. Automation of measurements, data evaluation, and making decision.
Requirements:Basic courses in mathematical analysis in real and complex range, general courses in physics, informatics, and mathematical statistics within the scope of first 3 years study at FNSPE CTU in Prague.
Key words:Nondestructive diagnostics, NDT, NDE, Digital Signal Processing (DSP), spectral analysis, ultrasonic methods, acoustic emission.
ReferencesKey references:
[1] www.ndt.net, www.ndt-ed.org,
[2] Klyuev V.V., Zusman G.V., eds.: Nondestructive Testing and Diagnostics Hanbook. (RSNDTD, Moscow, Metrix Instruments Co., Houston, 2004)

Recommended references:
[3] Shull P.J., ed. : Nondestructive Evaluation - Theory, Techniques, and Applications. (Marcel Dekker, Inc., N.Y., Basel, 2002),
[4] Klyuev V.V., Zusman G.V., eds.: Nondestructive Testing and Diagnostics Hanbook. (RSNDTD, Moscow, Metrix Instruments Co., Houston, 2004),
[5] Nondestructive Testing Handbook, Vol. I - IX. (The American Society for NDT, Columbus, USA),
[6] www.cndt.cz , www.asnt.org, www.dgzfp.de,
[7] Journals: NDT-Welding Bulletin (CNDT), Materials Evaluation (ASNT, USA), Research in Nondestructive Evaluation (ASNT, USA), NDTandE (Elsevier), Journal of Acoustic Emission (AEWG, USA), Ultrasonics (Elsevier)

Media and tools: Training room with computer projection, laboratory with equipment for ultrasonic and acoustic emission nondestructive testing

01ZTG Ambrož 4+0 zk - - 4 -
Course:01ZTGIng. Ambrož Petr Ph.D.----
Abstract:
Outline:
Outline (exercises):
Goals:
Requirements:
Key words:
References


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